In the AI-centric world I (and many data scientists) tend to live in, everything is cutting edge (or close to it). We take cloud and PaaS for granted. It’s hard for us to imagine that in 2019, many organizations are still running SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 in production. Further more, many of these same organizations are still using SSIS 2008 and 2008 R2 in production as well.

Yesterday, support ended for SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2. Leaving many in a state of fear and loathing. Andy Leonard, co-host of Data Driven, has written an insight post about this very problem.

Cheer up, you’re not alone and it can only get better from here on out.

If you are reading this post and thinking or saying, “Yep. He’s writing about me,” you are not alone. If you feel bad about this, I have spoken to people who are still running DTS (Data Transformation Services) from the SQL Server 2000 days. If you’re feeling smug because you’re running SQL Server 2016 or 2017 in production, test-drive the moccasins of folks who are hampered by mission-critical third-party enterprise solutions for which later SQL Server versions have not been certified – some of whom are operating in regulation-heavy industries.

Azure Data Share is available in public preview now and offers a simple pane of glass over your data sharing relationships.

In this episode of Azure Data Friday, learn how to easily provision a new data share, add datasets to it, specify your terms of use and invite recipients. Guest Joanna walks through how you can stay in control of your data through monitoring and governance features which ensure you are always in control of your data.

If you’re looking to take the Microsoft AI-100 exam, then study everything mentioned in this blog post carefully. Mario Mendieta compiled this handy list of resources from Microsoft docs, Microsoft Ignite talks and video lectures, Pluralsight courses, and official Microsoft blog posts.

Here’s a list of the skills and objectives measured on the AI-100 exam, taken from the official exam’s objective. The percentages next to each objective area represent the number of questions that you will find in that area on the exam. Below each topic, you will find links to the resources that I have found helpful.

If you’re looking to take the Microsoft exams of DP-200 and DP-201, then you need to read this blog post carefully and study everything recommended in it.

It helped me to pass both tests with flying colors and, since the contents of both exams are similar, this one post will help you with both.

Also, I recommend taking DP-201 before taking DP-200.

Here’s a list of the skills and objectives measured on the DP-200 exam, taken from the official exam’s objectives. The percentages next to each objective area represent the number of questions that you will find in that area on the exam. Below each topic, you will find links to the resources that I have found helpful.

Machine learning is capable of doing some amazing things. However, the state of the art tends to be limited to academic and large corporate institutions. What would happen if artists, filmmakers, and the creative community had access to cutting edge technology without the heavy investment in research and development.

The Verge looks into just that.

Say you’re an animator on a budget who wants to turn a video of a human actor into a 3D model. Instead of hiring expensive motion capture equipment, you could use Runway to apply a neural network called “PosetNet” to your footage, creating wireframe models of your actor that can then be exported for animation.

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech, specializing in quantum mechanics, gravity, and cosmology. He is the author of several popular books: one on the arrow of time called From Eternity to Here, one on the Higgs boson called The Particle at the End of the Universe, and one on science and philosophy called The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself.

He has an upcoming book on Quantum Mechanics that you can preorder now called Something Deeply Hidden.

This is a great interview with Lex Fridman.

You can now derive rich insights from your IoT data in Azure Time Series Insights using advanced visualization options.

The team has introduced  several new capabilities into TSI Explorer since we launched last December. These include significant Performance improvements, new Explorations like Scatter Plots & Heatmaps, as well as an enhanced JS SDK and more. Rahul Kayal, PM in the TSI team walks us through the latest additions and enhancements in TSI.

Check this video out to learn more.     

Try Azure Time Series Insights today: https://aka.ms/tsipreview
Check out the JS SDK for TSI in action: https://aka.ms/tsiclientdemos
Try Azure IoT for free today: https://aka.ms/aft-iot