Blazor is a Single Page Application framework created by Microsoft.

With Blazor, you write C# to generate dynamic content and with Blazor WebAssembly you can become a full stack developer with C# on both front end and back end.

In this course by Frank Liu (via freeCodeCamp.org), you will learn about the architecture, how Blazor works, and how to create a real-world project as you learn to use Blazor.

Course Contents

  • (0:00:00) Introduction
  • (0:00:34) Blazor Architecture Overview
  • (0:11:59) Blazor Architecture In Depth
  • (0:24:00) Blazor Hosting Models
  • (0:32:23) Project Structure
  • (0:48:31) Data Binding
  • (1:12:21) Components Basics
  • (1:33:33) Communication Between Components Overview
  • (1:37:59) Component Parameters
  • (1:45:03) Route Parameters
  • (1:57:05) Cascading Parameters
  • (2:14:58) EventCallBack
  • (2:27:16) Referencing Child Components
  • (2:40:06) Templated Components – RenderFragment
  • (2:51:31) Templated Components – Generic Typed Item List
  • (3:07:01) Templated Components – Generic Typed RenderFragment
  • (3:27:27) Templated Components – Generic Typed RenderFragment as a Form
  • (3:37:30) When is Rendering Triggered
  • (3:59:45) Lifecycle Events Sequence
  • (4:11:39) Avoiding Data Initialization Pitfall
  • (4:16:15) Forms and Validations
  • (4:22:00) Dependency Injection
  • (4:49:34) State Management with Flux in C#
  • (5:34:37) Authentication
  • (6:04:18) Creating a reusable DataGrid Component – Columns Configuration
  • (6:36:27) Creating a reusable DataGrid Component – Paging
  • (7:16:49) Creating a reusable DataGrid Component – Sorting
  • (7:42:51) Thank you and My Contact Info

freeCodeCamp.org

Learn Calculus 1 in this full college course.

This course was created by Dr. Linda Green, a lecturer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Check out her YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkyLJh6hQS1TlhUZxOMjTFw

Lecture Notes

Course Contents:

  • (0:00:00) [Corequisite] Rational Expressions
  • (0:09:40) [Corequisite] Difference Quotient
  • (0:18:20) Graphs and Limits
  • (0:25:51) When Limits Fail to Exist
  • (0:31:28) Limit Laws
  • (0:37:07) The Squeeze Theorem
  • (0:42:55) Limits using Algebraic Tricks
  • (0:56:04) When the Limit of the Denominator is 0
  • (1:08:40) [Corequisite] Lines: Graphs and Equations
  • (1:17:09) [Corequisite] Rational Functions and Graphs
  • (1:30:35) Limits at Infinity and Graphs
  • (1:37:31) Limits at Infinity and Algebraic Tricks
  • (1:45:34) Continuity at a Point
  • (1:53:21) Continuity on Intervals
  • (1:59:43) Intermediate Value Theorem
  • (2:03:37) [Corequisite] Right Angle Trigonometry
  • (2:11:13) [Corequisite] Sine and Cosine of Special Angles
  • (2:19:16) [Corequisite] Unit Circle Definition of Sine and Cosine
  • (2:24:46) [Corequisite] Properties of Trig Functions
  • (2:35:25) [Corequisite] Graphs of Sine and Cosine
  • (2:41:57) [Corequisite] Graphs of Sinusoidal Functions
  • (2:52:10) [Corequisite] Graphs of Tan, Sec, Cot, Csc
  • (3:01:03) [Corequisite] Solving Basic Trig Equations
  • (3:08:14) Derivatives and Tangent Lines
  • (3:22:55) Computing Derivatives from the Definition
  • (3:34:02) Interpreting Derivatives
  • (3:42:33) Derivatives as Functions and Graphs of Derivatives
  • (3:56:25) Proof that Differentiable Functions are Continuous
  • (4:01:09) Power Rule and Other Rules for Derivatives
  • (4:07:42) [Corequisite] Trig Identities
  • (4:15:14) [Corequisite] Pythagorean Identities
  • (4:20:35) [Corequisite] Angle Sum and Difference Formulas
  • (4:28:31) [Corequisite] Double Angle Formulas
  • (4:36:01) Higher Order Derivatives and Notation
  • (4:39:22) Derivative of e^x
  • (4:46:52) Proof of the Power Rule and Other Derivative Rules
  • (4:56:31) Product Rule and Quotient Rule
  • (5:02:09) Proof of Product Rule and Quotient Rule
  • (5:10:40) Special Trigonometric Limits
  • (5:17:31) [Corequisite] Composition of Functions
  • (5:29:54) [Corequisite] Solving Rational Equations
  • (5:40:02) Derivatives of Trig Functions
  • (5:46:23) Proof of Trigonometric Limits and Derivatives
  • (5:54:38) Rectilinear Motion
  • (6:11:41) Marginal Cost
  • (6:16:51) [Corequisite] Logarithms: Introduction
  • (6:25:32) [Corequisite] Log Functions and Their Graphs
  • (6:36:17) [Corequisite] Combining Logs and Exponents
  • (6:40:55) [Corequisite] Log Rules
  • (6:49:27) The Chain Rule
  • (6:58:44) More Chain Rule Examples and Justification
  • (7:07:43) Justification of the Chain Rule
  • (7:10:00) Implicit Differentiation
  • (7:20:28) Derivatives of Exponential Functions
  • (7:25:38) Derivatives of Log Functions
  • (7:29:38) Logarithmic Differentiation
  • (7:37:08) [Corequisite] Inverse Functions
  • (7:51:22) Inverse Trig Functions
  • (8:00:56) Derivatives of Inverse Trigonometric Functions
  • (8:12:11) Related Rates – Distances
  • (8:17:55) Related Rates – Volume and Flow
  • (8:22:21) Related Rates – Angle and Rotation
  • (8:28:20) [Corequisite] Solving Right Triangles
  • (8:34:54) Maximums and Minimums
  • (8:46:18) First Derivative Test and Second Derivative Test
  • (8:51:37) Extreme Value Examples
  • (9:01:33) Mean Value Theorem
  • (9:09:09) Proof of Mean Value Theorem
  • (0:14:59) [Corequisite] Solving Right Triangles
  • (9:25:20) Derivatives and the Shape of the Graph
  • (9:33:31) Linear Approximation
  • (9:48:28) The Differential
  • (9:59:11) L’Hospital’s Rule
  • (10:06:27) L’Hospital’s Rule on Other Indeterminate Forms
  • (10:16:13) Newtons Method
  • (10:27:45) Antiderivatives
  • (10:33:24) Finding Antiderivatives Using Initial Conditions
  • (10:41:59) Any Two Antiderivatives Differ by a Constant
  • (10:45:19) Summation Notation
  • (10:49:12) Approximating Area
  • (11:04:22) The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 1
  • (11:15:02) The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 2
  • (11:22:17) Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
  • (11:29:18) The Substitution Method
  • (11:38:07) Why U-Substitution Works
  • (11:40:23) Average Value of a Function
  • (11:47:57) Proof of the Mean Value Theorem for Integrals

It’s been 19 years since that Tuesday morning when the world changed.

DSC00018

The weather was perfect – blue skies, clear, and it felt like anything could happen.

Yesterday, was the most “Monday of all Mondays” for me and I walked out of my apartment building on John St. determined that today was going to be better.

It wasn’t better, but it certainly was different kind of day.

In this livestream, I reflect on where I was vs where I was supposed to be and what lessons I took away from 9/11.