Lex Fridman recently interviewed Garry Kasparov, considered by many to be the greatest chess player of all time.

From 1986 until his retirement in 2005, he dominated the chess world, ranking world number 1 for most of those 19 years. While he has many historic matches against human chess players, in the long arc of history he may be remembered for his match again a machine, IBM’s Deep Blue. His initial victories and eventual loss to Deep Blue captivated the imagination of the world of what role Artificial Intelligence systems may play in our civilization’s future. That excitement inspired an entire generation of AI researchers, including myself, to get into the field. Garry is also a pro-democracy political thinker and leader, a fearless human-rights activist, and author of several books including How Life Imitates Chess which is a book on strategy and decision-making, Winter Is Coming which is a book articulating his opposition to the Putin regime, and Deep Thinking which is a book the role of both artificial intelligence and human intelligence in defining our future.  

EPISODE LINKS:

OUTLINE:

  • 0:00 – Introduction
  • 1:33 – Love of winning and hatred of losing
  • 4:54 – Psychological elements
  • 9:03 – Favorite games
  • 16:48 – Magnus Carlsen
  • 23:06 – IBM Deep Blue
  • 37:39 – Morality
  • 38:59 – Autonomous vehicles
  • 42:03 – Fall of the Soviet Union
  • 45:50 – Putin
  • 52:25 – Life

SQL Server 2019 is the latest version of the versatile and venerable SQL Server.

This latest version continues to redefine SQL Server from a traditional relational database system to a data platform for every data scenario from OLTP to DW to now big data and analytics.

In this video, get a quick overview of all the new things in SQL Server 2019 and introduce all of the other videos in this series that dive into the details.

Grist has Randall Munroe explain unique ways to power your home.

Somewhat timely given what’s going on in California.

xkcd on the best (and worst) ways to power your house with renewable energy. Our video features just a few of the many “useless but entertaining” ideas from his latest book, How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems.

Siraj Raval shows off examples of machine learning apps from his students.

If you’re wondering about my stance on the recent controversies around Siraj, I recorded a Data Point about that.

Machine Learning powers almost every internet service we use these days, but it’s rare to find a full pipeline example of machine learning being deployed in a web app. In this episode, I’d like to present 5 full-stack machine learning demos submitted as midterm projects from the students of my current course. The midterm assignment was to create a paid machine learning web app, and after receiving countless incredible submissions, I’ve decided to share my favorite 5 publicly. I was surprised by how many students in the course had never coded before and to see them building a full-stack web app in a few weeks was a very fulfilling experience. Use these examples as a template to help you ideate on potential business ideas to make a positive impact in the world using machine learning. And if you’d like, be sure to reach out and support each of the students I’ve demoed here today in any way can you offer. They’ve been working their butts off. Enjoy!

Presentation notebook: https://colab.research.google.com/drive/1m5aLHPnwIhVX8zgMvZUtK4iG9xSaMbk8

The Science Elf explores the rise of and fall of Flash, a technology that enabled rich interactivity on the internet since the late 90s.

It became ubiquitous on the web and met its doom at the hands of the Steve Jobs, no really.

I do take issue with the statement in the video that Flash was a “flash in the pan” technology. It was prevalent for the better part of dozen years. Flash had staying power and it was only the pull of the iPhone that killed it.

Big Think has a fascinating interview with Dr. Michio Kaku.

Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). He is the author of “The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth” (https://amzn.to/2lQyjy4)

Aman Bhardwaj and Yaron Schneider join Scott Hanselman to talk about the core concepts of Distributed Application Runtime (Dapr).

Dapr is a portable, event-driven runtime that makes it easy for developers to build resilient, microservice stateless and stateful applications that run on the cloud and edge and embraces the diversity of languages and developer frameworks     

Dapr Resources