CNBC takes a look at what’s next for the workspace based on what the big tech companies are doing.

Tech offices, from Apple’s 2.8 million square-foot “spaceship” campus, to Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters complete with a botanical garden, have always pushed the envelope of office space. But coronavirus may make this type of work environment a thing of the past, at least for the near future, as companies try to balance communal work with safety. Here’s a look at how tech companies are changing their offices and work policies as they ease into reopening. 

While in Seattle a few weeks ago, I had the chance to see the Spheres for myself.

Wall Street Journal explores the Spheres, Amazon’s giant biodomes in downtown Seattle, allow employees to escape the office to work and brainstorm surrounded by nature.

Take a tour with NBBJ architect John Savo as he shows off the features of the workspace, including a five-story living wall with 25,000 plants. Photo Illustration: Drew Evans/The Wall Street Journal.

Katherine Bindley of the Wall Street Journal is at CES to take a look at the latest AI-infused cameras on the market.

Two new smart systems use cameras, artificial intelligence and an assortment of sensors to keep watch over you—Patscan looks for threats in public spaces, while Eyeris monitors the driver and passengers in a car. WSJ’s Katherine Bindley visits CES to explores their advantages, as well as their privacy costs.

The Verge explores Ikea’s push into smart home technology and why that’s a big deal.

For seven years, Ikea has treated the smart home as a hobby. That’s changing now that Björn Block’s Home Smart division has been promoted to the same importance as Living Room, Bedroom, and all the other Ikea businesses that have come to define the company. Ikea faces the challenge of teaming up with Google, Amazon, Apple, and other tech giants while also battling them for primacy in the home.

Read the full feature here: http://bit.ly/38VyVH9