Machine learning is capable of doing some amazing things. However, the state of the art tends to be limited to academic and large corporate institutions. What would happen if artists, filmmakers, and the creative community had access to cutting edge technology without the heavy investment in research and development.

The Verge looks into just that.

Say you’re an animator on a budget who wants to turn a video of a human actor into a 3D model. Instead of hiring expensive motion capture equipment, you could use Runway to apply a neural network called “PosetNet” to your footage, creating wireframe models of your actor that can then be exported for animation.

Art has always reflected the zeitgeist of the times. AI is proving to be no exception. Here’s an interesting look at Holly Herndon’s recent work in this space.

Like so much art these days, Herndon’s work is a reflection of the times. Its nuanced synthesis of electronic manipulation and pop songcraft — including choral vocals from an international ensemble, digitized voice renderings from an AI baby she’s raising named Spawn, and her own voice that’s enhanced with vocoder — feels like a move to shift genre and conversation. To that end, PROTO‘s thoughtful, futuristic concept is very much in the vein of game-changing albums like Kanye West’s Yeezus.

Just over two years ago, The Met launched an Open Access Program seeking to make the images and data of public-domain works in the museum’s collection available under an open data promise. 

The program fills an important role in The Met’s mission to broaden global reach by making the museum’s collection one of the most accessible, discoverable, and useful on the internet. See how The Met is now working to generate new knowledge about each artwork at scale and uncover latent insights with AI.