Ashlee Vance reports on a New Zealand company that has built its own space-plane prototype. Dawn Aerospace hopes to establish a cheap, quick way to transport objects into orbit, and in doing so transform the commercialization of space.

For decades, humans have been trying to make a plane that can reach space and return to Earth by way of a runway. Space shuttles aside, only now is the dawn of the space plane finally upon us.

Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads to Finland for a three-part exploration of this traditionally contented country’s tech industry.

Episode One tackles the critical role Nokia once played in its economy, and the devastating impact Apple’s iPhone had on both.

Since then, Finland has managed to revive the sector: Instead of the once-ubiquitous Nokia phone, Helsinki’s vibrant tech scene is now dominated by companies making mobile games like Angry Birds and Clash of Clans.

In this ground-breaking episode of Bloomberg’s “Hello World,” the story of AI’s rise is told in detail, as journalist Ashlee Vance heads to the unexpected birthplace of the technology, Canada.

The Arcimoto is a three-wheeled, all-electric vehicle that is small, fast and incredibly fun to drive. The grand vision behind the Arcimoto is that people will use it for most of their day-to-day driving instead of relying on their bulky, gas guzzling cars.

In this video, Ashlee Vance heads to the Arcimoto’s birthplace in Eugene, Oregon to take the vehicle out for a spin and to hear the saga of its creation. Also, props for the “Portlandia” style intro to the video. Smile

In part three of the documentary series Hello World Shenzhen [Part 1 | Part 2], Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads out into a city where you can’t use cash or credit cards, only your smartphone, where AI facial-recognition software instantly spots and tickets jaywalkers, and where at least one factory barely needs people.

This is the society that China’s government and leading tech companies are racing to make a reality, with little time to question which advancements are net positives for the rest of us.

For two weeks each year, college students take over a massive stadium and fill it with fighting drones, plastic ammo, and rapt spectators. This is Robomasters, held in Shenzhen by DJI, the world’s leading drone maker. In part two of Hello World Shenzhen, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance goes inside the world of Nerf-style robo-warfare to spotlight the kinds of innovation that have kept DJI, at the forefront of a booming market, and demonstrates why you may not want him on your squad.