Kevin Stratvert shows us in this step-by-step tutorial how to use your iPhone or Android Phone as a Microphone for you Windows, Mac, or Linux PC.

Download & install Wo Mic: https://wolicheng.com/womic/Audacity Recorder: https://www.audacityteam.org


Index:

  • 0:00 Introduction
  • 1:13 Install on iPhone or Android
  • 4:33 Install desktop client
  • 4:55 Install virtual microphone driver
  • 6:25 Connect phone with PC
  • 7:41 Test recording using phone as mic
  • 8:38 Using Wo Mic in Zoom
  • 8:57 Using Wo Mic in Teams
  • 9:23 Uninstalling Wo Mic from phone & PC
  • 10:53 Wrap up

Separating a song into separate vocals and instruments has always been a headache for producers, DJs, and anyone else who wants to play around with isolated audio.

While there are lots of ways to do it, the process is often be time-consuming and the results are lacking.

However, a new open source AI tool makes this tricky task faster and easier.

The software is called Spleeter and was developed by music streaming service Deezer for research purposes. Yesterday the company released it as an open source package, putting the code up on Github for anyone to download and use.

Siraj Raval generates his own voice with AI using some cutting edge techniques.

This is a relatively new technology and people have started generating not just celebrity voices, but entire musical pieces as well. The technology to generate sounds, both voices & music, has been rapidly improving the past few years thanks to deep learning. In this episode, I’ll first demo some AI generated music. Then, i’ll explain the physics of a waveform and how DeepMind used waveform-based data to generate some pretty realistic sounds in 2016. At the end, I’ll describe the cutting edge of generative sound modeling, a paper released just 2 months ago called “MelNet”. Enjoy!