Here’s an interesting perspective on what blockchain and open source have in common and how they will enrich each other in the years to come.

The many similarities between blockchain and the open source are not just a coincidence. Analysts and developers believe that the new technology is picking up from where open source left off. There is a limit to what companies can share with open source. Open source is not known to open up live systems and it can never open their data.

Integration with smart contracts is a common topic with developers. Whether with apps, data, messaging or services there is a desire to connect the functions and events of smart contracts in an end to end scenario. In this episode, we look at the different types of scenarios and look at the most common use case – how to quickly expose your smart contract functions as microservices with the Ethereum Blockchain Connector for Logic Apps or Flow.

Additional documentation is available at: http://aka.ms/ethlogicapp 

 

There are multiple scenarios where having attestable documents and media is valuable. Media doesn’t belong on the blockchain, but hashes of the media and metadata can be added. In this video we demonstrate a blockchain devkit accelerator that shows how to hash a media file, uploaded to a service like Adobe Creative Cloud, and its metadata and add it to a blockchain.

URL: https://github.com/Azure-Samples/blockchain/blob/master/blockchain-development-kit/accelerators/attestable-documents-and-media/blockchain-workbench/AdobeCreativeCloud/README.md

Yesterday’s post about GDPR and Blockchains had me wondering about potential fixes for this issue.

This video on Channel9 provides an overview of some of the more popular privacy features employed on private consortiums to enable sharing data only with specific participants in a network.  

It turns out that there are a variety of ways and the architecture of these are discussed with a brief demo using the Quorum blockchain.

Registries are used in every industry and in multiple scenarios. Blockchain-based registries that are shared, immutable and cryptographically secure serve an important need, but it’s not often apparent how to write these sort of contracts. In this episode we review a blockchain devkit accelerator that can help generate the contracts from simple JSON based descriptions.     

Code: https://github.com/Azure-Samples/blockchain/tree/master/blockchain-development-kit/accelerators/registry-generator

Here’s an overview of how to use Azure’s serverless Ethereum Connector to transform smart contracts into an automated, visual workflow using the rich Azure Logic Apps Connectors ecosystem. The video introduces the core concepts of Logic Apps and demonstrate a sample workflow triggered by a Solidity event, including how to read smart contract properties and write them to Azure Blob storage.

Additional documentation is available at http://aka.ms/ethlogicapp