Since totaling my car in an accident last December, my eagerness to get a self-driving car has only accelerated. Here’s an interesting look at the training data used to train these AIs and who generates them.

Autonomous cars are only as good as the human drivers they learn from — so the people who teach these systems how to drive need to be excellent drivers themselves. To get a look at what it takes to do this job, Bloomberg Technology’s Aki Ito recently joined two vehicle operators who work for self-driving car startup Aurora Innovation Inc. on a test drive in the chaos of downtown San Francisco. This is an episode of Next Jobs, a mini-documentary series about careers of the future.

In this ground-breaking episode of Bloomberg’s “Hello World,” the story of AI’s rise is told in detail, as journalist Ashlee Vance heads to the unexpected birthplace of the technology, Canada.

The Arcimoto is a three-wheeled, all-electric vehicle that is small, fast and incredibly fun to drive. The grand vision behind the Arcimoto is that people will use it for most of their day-to-day driving instead of relying on their bulky, gas guzzling cars.

In this video, Ashlee Vance heads to the Arcimoto’s birthplace in Eugene, Oregon to take the vehicle out for a spin and to hear the saga of its creation. Also, props for the “Portlandia” style intro to the video. Smile

In part three of the documentary series Hello World Shenzhen [Part 1 | Part 2], Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads out into a city where you can’t use cash or credit cards, only your smartphone, where AI facial-recognition software instantly spots and tickets jaywalkers, and where at least one factory barely needs people.

This is the society that China’s government and leading tech companies are racing to make a reality, with little time to question which advancements are net positives for the rest of us.