Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads to Finland for a three-part exploration of this traditionally contented country’s tech industry.

Episode One tackles the critical role Nokia once played in its economy, and the devastating impact Apple’s iPhone had on both.

Since then, Finland has managed to revive the sector: Instead of the once-ubiquitous Nokia phone, Helsinki’s vibrant tech scene is now dominated by companies making mobile games like Angry Birds and Clash of Clans.

Microgravity can be used to unlock old materials and make new ones in ways that can’t be replicated on Earth. Private companies know this, and are leading the charge toward the next gold rush. But can they turn low Earth orbit into a home for the next industrial revolution?

Our brain has 86 million neurons connected by 3 million kilometers of nerve fibers and The Human Brain Project is mapping it all.

One of the key applications is neuromorphic computing – computers inspired by brain architecture that may one day be able to learn as we do.

Bloomberg takes a look at the future of non-terrestrial real estate.

Over the past few decades, the International Space Station has allowed astronauts to live, work and conduct research in microgravity. But with the station’s planned retirement by 2030, private companies are being asked to create the next generation of space habitat.

Bloomberg describes how the first trillionaires will come to be.

There are millions of asteroids in our solar system. Because some are full of materials that are rare on Earth, they have been valued at stupendous amounts. But the most valuable resource in space may be something that’s abundant back on the ground.

Bloomberg’ Next Jobs interviews Tommy DeVoss. DeVoss used to break into websites illicitly. But after serving time for his crimes, he now uses his skills to earn an honest living.

Through arrangements known as bug bounty programs, companies pay him to find security holes in their systems.

He’s now earned more than $1 million in this emerging profession.

Bloomberg explores the very real digital disruption happening in the call center industry.

This video explores a call center in the Dominican Republic, where Laura Morales is designing chatbots to respond to customer service requests.

Morales, a former call center agent herself, has benefited from her new job that is better paid and higher skilled than what she used to do.

Will these chatbots end up replacing the livelihoods of millions of agents around the world?