Bloomberg’ Next Jobs interviews Tommy DeVoss. DeVoss used to break into websites illicitly. But after serving time for his crimes, he now uses his skills to earn an honest living.

Through arrangements known as bug bounty programs, companies pay him to find security holes in their systems.

He’s now earned more than $1 million in this emerging profession.

Bloomberg explores the very real digital disruption happening in the call center industry.

This video explores a call center in the Dominican Republic, where Laura Morales is designing chatbots to respond to customer service requests.

Morales, a former call center agent herself, has benefited from her new job that is better paid and higher skilled than what she used to do.

Will these chatbots end up replacing the livelihoods of millions of agents around the world?

Since totaling my car in an accident last December, my eagerness to get a self-driving car has only accelerated. Here’s an interesting look at the training data used to train these AIs and who generates them.

Autonomous cars are only as good as the human drivers they learn from — so the people who teach these systems how to drive need to be excellent drivers themselves. To get a look at what it takes to do this job, Bloomberg Technology’s Aki Ito recently joined two vehicle operators who work for self-driving car startup Aurora Innovation Inc. on a test drive in the chaos of downtown San Francisco. This is an episode of Next Jobs, a mini-documentary series about careers of the future.

In this ground-breaking episode of Bloomberg’s “Hello World,” the story of AI’s rise is told in detail, as journalist Ashlee Vance heads to the unexpected birthplace of the technology, Canada.