Ever since my concussion three years ago, I have been fascinated by the brain and how to nourish it.

A major breakthrough in quantum tech allows us to see brain activity in far greater detail than ever before.

Pindex examines the fascinating research going on this space.

Big Think has a fascinating interview with Dr. Michio Kaku.

Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). He is the author of “The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth” (https://amzn.to/2lQyjy4)

Microsoft Research explores how the brains beget the mind.

How do molecules, cells, and synapses effect reasoning, intelligence, language, science? Despite dazzling progress in experimental neuroscience we do not seem to be making progress in the overarching question — the gap is huge and a completely new approach seems to be required.

As Richard Axel recently put it: “We don’t have a logic for the transformation of neural activity into thought.” What kind of formal system would qualify as this “logic”? I will sketch a possible answer.

(Joint work with Santosh Vempala, Dan Mitropolsky, Mike Collins, Wolfgang Maass, and Larry Abbott.)

Talk slides: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/uploads/prod/2019/09/A-Calculus-for-Brain-Computation-SLIDES.pdf

In this episode of the AI Podcast, Lex Fridman interviews Paola Arlotta.

Paola Arlotta is a professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University.

You could say that she studies “naturally intelligent” systems.

Specifically, she is interested in understanding the molecular laws that govern the birth, differentiation and assembly of the human brain’s cerebral cortex. She explores the complexity of the brain by studying and engineering elements of how the brain develops.

It sounds like science fiction: a device that can reconnect a paralyzed person’s brain to his or her body. But that’s exactly what the experimental NeuroLife system does. Developed by Battelle and Ohio State University,

NeuroLife uses a brain implant, an algorithm and an electrode sleeve to give paralysis patients back control of their limbs. For Ian Burkhart, NeuroLife’s first test subject, the implications could be life-changing.

As someone who has spent the last two years working on getting as any certification in data science as I possibly can, many people ask me, “How did you learn so much so fast?”

The answer is simple: study the brain, how it learns, and then test out new ways to learn faster.

In this video, Barbara Oakley explains how the brain is constantly fluctuating between a “learning” mode and an “understanding” mode.

When you’re sitting there reading (and re-reading!) a textbook, unable to make sense of it, your brain is actually learning. It just takes the decompressing part of your brain for it to all be unpacked. It’s called the neural chunk theory and you can learn to utilize it to your advantage by learning how to study differently; small bursts of inactivity and breaks can really make a big difference in how to memorize seemingly difficult information by combining bigger and bigger “chunks” of information until you understand the big picture. It’s fascinating stuff