Here’s an interesting look at “Data Labelers” and how cheap human labor could once again be China’s competitive advantage.

In order to avoid plowing into other cars or making illegal lane changes, they need a lot of help. In China, that help is increasingly coming from rooms full of college students. Li Zhenwei is a data labeler. His job, which didn’t even exist a few years ago, involves sitting at a computer, clicking frame-by-frame through endless hours of dashcam footage, and drawing lines over each photo to help the computer recognize lane markers.

Shenzhen may well be the most fascinating city in the world. It makes the majority of our electronics. It clones the best technology Silicon Valley has to offer with ease. And, lately, Shenzhen buzzes with new ideas and an unrivaled energy that ensure it will play a major role in shaping our collective futures.

In part three of the documentary series Hello World Shenzhen [Part 1 | Part 2], Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads out into a city where you can’t use cash or credit cards, only your smartphone, where AI facial-recognition software instantly spots and tickets jaywalkers, and where at least one factory barely needs people.

This is the society that China’s government and leading tech companies are racing to make a reality, with little time to question which advancements are net positives for the rest of us.

In this video, Siraj Raval explores the rise of AI in China.

From the video description:

The Chinese state run news agency Xinhua recently revealed the first Artificial Intelligence news anchor. They’re now able to generate video of a newscaster using a model trained on real newscaster data and use it to disseminate information 24/7. When I saw this, I knew it was time to start studying China’s role in the AI revolution in-depth. In this video, I’ll cover China’s power structure, generative adversarial networks, its startup scene, Confucianism, the social credit scoring system, algorithmic policing, surveillance, privacy, autonomous weapons, and convolutional neural networks. A lot of different topics to cover, but I hope this video provides a coherent narrative around the use of AI in China and how it plays into the global AI community. Enjoy!

I recently finished listening to Kai-Fu Lee’s book, AI Superpowers, and I have to say it is impressive and insightful on multiple levels: professionally, politically, economically, and even personally.

Having worked in AI research since the mid 1980s and having founded Microsoft Research China and later leading Google China, Mr Lee certainly knows a thing or two about AI.

Here is Kai-Fu Lee at a recent TED talk exploring how AI can save our humanity.