More than half of the children in the United States play video games on Roblox.

In fact, the massively popular gaming platform has grown so much during the coronavirus pandemic, the company’s valuation has skyrocketed from $4 billion in early 2020 to $30 billion in early 2021.

What makes Roblox so popular?

While terrestrial tourism has been hit hard due to the pandemic, entrepreneurs and visionaries have their eyes cast spaceward. 

Space tourism has been, almost, nonexistent in the past, but Virgin Galactic, SpaceX and Blue Origin are looking to change that.

However, accessibility to space tourism remains limited to the richest of the rich, with ticket prices ranging from hundreds of thousands of dollars to millions.

Development of these space tourism programs is costing these companies billions and each has a different reason for pursuing this, as of yet, unproven market.

CNBC takes a look at what’s next for the workspace based on what the big tech companies are doing.

Tech offices, from Apple’s 2.8 million square-foot “spaceship” campus, to Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters complete with a botanical garden, have always pushed the envelope of office space. But coronavirus may make this type of work environment a thing of the past, at least for the near future, as companies try to balance communal work with safety. Here’s a look at how tech companies are changing their offices and work policies as they ease into reopening. 

Over the past decade, prices for solar panels and wind farms have reached all-time lows.

However, the price for lithium ion batteries, the leading energy storage technology, has remained high.

So researchers are exploring other alternatives, including flow batteries, thermal batteries, and gravity-based systems.

In October 2019, Google announced its 53-qubit quantum computer named Sycamore had achieved ‘quantum supremacy.’

That’s when quantum computers can complete tasks exponentially more quickly than their classical counterparts.

In this case, Google said its quantum machine completed a task in 200 seconds that would have taken the world’s most powerful computer 10,000 years to complete. IBM, another major player in quantum computing, took issue with the findings.

Either way, it was a big milestone in quantum computing, and it’s leading to a lot of hype in the field. Here’s how quantum computing works, and how it could change everything from Wall Street to Big Pharma and beyond.

CNBC explores the rise of open source software and how it went from fringe movement to mainstream and core to the every enterprise.

Open-source software powers nearly all the world’s major companies. This software is freely available, and is developed collaboratively, maintained by a broad network that includes everyone from unpaid volunteers to employees at competing tech companies. Here’s how giving away software for free has proven to be a viable business model.