CNBC got a first look inside Lyft’s level 5 lab, where it builds self-driving cars that are being tested on roads now.

Self-driving rides are also available to select Lyft passengers in Arizona and Las Vegas, where Lyft opened its app to autonomous vehicle companies Waymo and Aptiv.

Lyft says it’s completed more than 75,000 self-driving rides.

Watch the video to see how the program works.

CNBC takes a closer look at what’s going on with its cryptocurrency project, Libra

When Facebook first announced it was getting into the crypto business—with a basically unregulated currency called Libra—the reaction from Wall Street and government bankers was about as expected. Fast-foward a few months, and Libra is in trouble. The social media giant had lined up a long list of corporate backers for the initiative, including major players in the payments space. And in October 2019, several prominent backers began to back out. Here’s how Facebook’s crypto future got into serious trouble.

Deepfakes have started to appear everywhere.

From viral celebrity face-swaps to impersonations of political leaders – it can be hard to spot the difference between real and fake.

Digital impressions are starting to have real financial repercussions. In the U.S., an audio deepfake of a CEO reportedly scammed one company out of $10 million.

With the 2020 election not far off, there is huge potential for weaponizing deepfakes on social media.

Now, tech giants like Google, Twitter, Facebook and Microsoft are fighting back. With Facebook spending more than $10 million to fight deepfakes, what’s at stake for businesses, and what’s being done to detect and regulate them.

CNBC has a look at the Waldorf School where technology is not ever present in the classroom – an idea which runs counter to the prevailing philosophy that more tech equates to better education.

The Waldorf teaching philosophy is used at more than 1,000 institutions in 91 countries, including 136 schools in the U.S. Technology and screens aren’t used at all through 8th grade, and are scarce even in high school. CNBC gets an inside look at what it is like.