Here’s an interesting blog blost co-authored by Shweta Mishra and Vinil Menon, both of CitiusTech. CitiusTech is a specialist provider of healthcare technology services which helps its customers to accelerate innovation in healthcare.  CitiusTech used Azure Cosmos DB to simplify the real-time collection and movement of healthcare data from variety of sources in a secured manner.

With the proliferation of patient information from established and current sources, accompanied with scrupulous regulations, healthcare systems today are gradually shifting towards near real-time data integration. 

The rise of Internet of Things (IoT) has enabled ordinary medical devices, wearables, traditional hospital deployed medical equipment to collect and share data. Within a wide area network (WAN), there are well defined standards and protocols, but with the ever increasing number of devices getting connected to the internet, there is a general lack of standards compliance and consistency of implementation. Moreover, data collation and generation from IoT enabled medical/mobile devices need specialized applications to cope with increasing volumes of data.

Watch this video to learn about business goals and technical challenges faced by real-world customers, why they chose Azure Cosmos DB, and the patterns they used to deliver high performance mission critical applications.

Matias Quaranta joins Scott Hanselman to share some best practices for creating serverless geo-distributed applications with Azure Cosmos DB. With the native integration between Azure Cosmos DB and Azure Functions, you can create database triggers, input bindings, and output bindings directly from your Azure Cosmos DB account. Using Azure Functions and Azure Cosmos DB, you can create and deploy event-driven serverless apps with low-latency access to rich data for a global user base

One of the keys (pun intended) of achieving optimal performance out of CosmosDB is partitioning properly.  In partitioning, the items in a container are divided into distinct subsets called logical partitions.

Azure Cosmos DB transparently and automatically manages the placement of logical partitions on physical partitions to efficiently satisfy the scalability and performance needs of the container. As the throughput and storage requirements of an application increase, Azure Cosmos DB moves logical partitions to automatically spread the load across a greater number of servers.

In case you have not heard already, Azure Cosmos DB is Microsoft’s globally distributed, horizontally partitioned, multi-model database service. The service is designed to allow customers to elastically (and independently) scale throughput and storage across any number of geographical regions.

What’s more, Azure Cosmos DB offers guaranteed low latency at the 99th percentile, 99.99% high availability, predictable throughput, and multiple well-defined consistency models.

How does it do this? Check out this post on the team’s blog.

The core type system of Azure Cosmos DB’s database engine is atom-record-sequence (ARS) based. Atoms consist of a small set of primitive types e.g. string, bool, number etc., records are structs and sequences are arrays consisting of atoms, records or sequences. The database engine of Azure Cosmos DB is capable of efficiently translating and projecting the data models onto the ARS based data model. The core data model of Azure Cosmos DB is natively accessible from dynamically typed programming languages and can be exposed as-is using JSON or other similar representations. The design also enables natively supporting popular database APIs for data access and query. Azure Cosmos DB’s database engine currently supports DocumentDB SQL, MongoDB, Azure Table Storage, and Gremlin graph query API.

Kirill Gavrylyuk joins Scott Hanselman to discuss new improvements for Azure Cosmos DB SDKs, including the new, idiomatic .NET SDK with friendlier, more intuitive programming model, better testability, better performance, .NET Standard 2.0 support, and now open sourced.     

 

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Learn about the new SDKs for Azure Cosmos DB with the JavaScript SDK as an example, talk about CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) with a simple JavaScript app to demonstrate it, a new, low-cost database offer in the Azure portal, Azure DevOps build task, cost saving tips, and support for multi-region strong consistency.

 

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