In this Data Point, Frank ponders the wider impact on jobs and businesses related to self-driving cars that are not immediately obvious. From driving schools to truck stops, everyone will feel the change.The question then becomes: how can we prepare the workforce for the impending upheaval in the job market? Will teaching to the test cut it? Or are we going to have to make learning play and play learning?

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

Show Notes:

Last week, I spoke to a group of high school students about careers in STEM. Aside from being happy that STEM is now encouraged, I pointed out to them that the workforce they will be entering may look different than the one they see now.  By the time they hit the workforce, digital transformation will have made short work of companies that have not become data driven. The only surviving and thriving companies will be the one who adapted quickly. 

Proving that point is this article from TechRepublic and helpful advice on how to stay ahead of the robots.

Here’s an interesting video related to the article:

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While grabbing coffee at a recently renovated McDonald’s, Frank ponders the future of work: both low-skill and higher skill work. There’s going to be no hiding from this: we are truly on the Eve of Disruption, where AI will impact everyone everywhere.It’s not all gloom and doom and there might be a strategy to survive and even thrive now and in the next economy.  Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

In this interview with Geoffrey Hinton, Martin Ford asks the pioneering AI researcher about the economics of a world dominated by AI and what to do about making sure the future is for everyone.

If you can dramatically increase productivity and make more goodies to go around, that should be a good thing. Whether or not it turns out to be a good thing depends entirely on the social system, and doesn’t depend at all on the technology. People are looking at the technology as if the technological advances are a problem. The problem is in the social systems, and whether we’re going to have a social system that shares fairly, or one that focuses all the improvement on the 1% and treats the rest of the people like dirt. That’s nothing to do with technology.

Robot restaurants are popping up all over downtown San Francisco, as a futuristic option for people to grab fast food for cheap. The latest example is Creator, a robotic restaurant that specializes in making gourmet hamburgers with their all-in-one burger robots. 350 sensors and 20 computers all work together to create the perfect burger.

While many will question the future of low skill jobs, the news may not be as dire as some would say and the cost savings comes from unexpected places.