Wide deployment of AI systems will up end the labor market and economy in ways we can barely yet imagine. Think of what someone from 1919 would think of Amazon, Facebook, or convenience stores.

Economists have been studying the relationship between technological change, productivity, and employment for a few centuries now.

Naturally, the rise of AI applications from driving cars to tumor detection in medical scans has now become a focus of their attention.

In September 2017, a group of distinguished economists gathered in Toronto to set out a research agenda for the Economics of Artificial Intelligence (AI). They covered questions such as what is economically unique about AI, what will be its impacts, and what are the right policies to enhance its benefits.

From CNBC International:

Imagine skipping hotel check-in and walking straight to your room with a scan of your face. This could soon become a reality at many hotels in China and around the world. CNBC’s Uptin Saiidi experiences what the hotel of the future may look like and Alibaba’s ambitious plans for the sector.

You can imagine the impact this will have on jobs in the hospitality industry.

Bloomberg explores the very real digital disruption happening in the call center industry.

This video explores a call center in the Dominican Republic, where Laura Morales is designing chatbots to respond to customer service requests.

Morales, a former call center agent herself, has benefited from her new job that is better paid and higher skilled than what she used to do.

Will these chatbots end up replacing the livelihoods of millions of agents around the world?

George Gilder, author of Life After Google, argues that bitcoin and blockchain technology is revolutionizing the Internet.

In this video, sit down with Peter Robinson to discuss technology, cloud computing, big data, and the growing role of blockchain in innovating new technologies.

From the description:

Gilder argues that cloud computing, while it was the hot new technology ten years ago, has reached its limits as the physical limitations of big data storage centers maxes out. Improvements in parsing big data are incremental at this point, and it’s time for the next big technology to take its place.

Gilder points to blockchain as the technology of the future, with its ability to prevent corruption and manipulation of transaction data and the infinite uses it could have in third world countries. Gilder also discusses the history of technology, artificial intelligence, and the revolutionary bitcoin.

He argues that artificial intelligence can never replace human intelligence and creativity and that in principle, it is impossible for machines to take over.

The future of shipping looks very much unmanned.

Today, container ships transport more than 90% of all goods in the world, but it can take over a month for those goods to sail from Beijing to New York. Automated cargo drones could be the disruption needed in a global supply chain that has been largely unchanged since the 1950s. By land, trucks move nearly 71% of all freight tonnage in the US, but there’s a shortage of truck drivers in the United States. So how do you speed up shipments while keeping personnel low?

I think we know how.