The future of shipping looks very much unmanned.

Today, container ships transport more than 90% of all goods in the world, but it can take over a month for those goods to sail from Beijing to New York. Automated cargo drones could be the disruption needed in a global supply chain that has been largely unchanged since the 1950s. By land, trucks move nearly 71% of all freight tonnage in the US, but there’s a shortage of truck drivers in the United States. So how do you speed up shipments while keeping personnel low?

I think we know how.

Here’s an interesting read on the importance of re-skilling the workforce to be ready when the robots and/or algorithms take away many (all?) of the jobs.

Recently, Amazon floated the idea that it would be fully automated in a decade: Not all of the 125,000 people who work at Amazon warehouses have to worry about losing their jobs to robots — not for 10 years or so, anyways. On Tuesday, Scott Anderson, director of Amazon […]

In this Data Point, Frank ponders the wider impact on jobs and businesses related to self-driving cars that are not immediately obvious. From driving schools to truck stops, everyone will feel the change.The question then becomes: how can we prepare the workforce for the impending upheaval in the job market? Will teaching to the test cut it? Or are we going to have to make learning play and play learning?

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

Show Notes: