Artificial intelligence (AI) can help us do stuff like finding a specific photo in our photos app, or translating signs into another language.

What if we applied the same technology to really big problems in areas like healthcare?

Google’s Dr. Lily Peng describes her journey from medicine to technology and outlines the potential of AI in healthcare, describing how her team trained an AI algorithm to detect diabetic eye disease in medical images to help doctors in India prevent millions of people from getting blind. Dr. Lily Peng is a doctor by training and now works with a team of doctors, scientists, and engineers at Google Health who use AI for medical imaging, to increase the availability and accuracy of care. Some of her team’s recent work includes building models to detect diabetic eye disease, predict cardiovascular health factors, and identify breast and lung cancer.

I recently started listening to Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink.

If you’re already a subscriber, go get it. If not, use this site to get a free audio book on me.

War is hell, but war is also a brutal teacher. War teaches you about brotherhood, honor, humility, and leadership. In this riveting talk, Jocko Willink explains from personal experience how war teaches you the most when things go wrong. Jocko asserts that when a team takes ownership of its problems, the problems get solved. 

Here’s a great TEDx talk about the nature of learning and acquiring new skills.

Josh Kaufman is the author of the #1 international bestseller, ‘The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business’, as well as the upcoming book ‘The First 20 Hours: Mastering the Toughest Part of Learning Anything.’ Josh specializes in teaching people from all walks of life how to master practical knowledge and skills. In his talk, he shares how having his first child inspired him to approach learning in a whole new way.  

Quantum computing, a subject as confusing as it is intriguing.

In this fascinating and entertaining talk, Scott Aaronson elucidates the potential and the limits of quantum computing.

In a sober fashion, he gives an overview of the state of research, telling us not only what we could expect from quantum computers in the future, but also what we probably shouldn’t.

Scott Aaronson is the David J. Bruton Centennial Professor of Computer Science at The University of Texas at Austin, USA, and director of its Quantum Information Center. He is well-known for his “complexity zoo,” which helps to classify problems that can be solved by computers, both quantum and classical, according to how hard it is to solve them.

Scott is an accomplished academic researcher who published dozens of influential papers and won various notable awards, like the Alan T. Waterman Award in 2012. Before his current position at UT Austin, he taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for nine years. In 2004, he received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley and held positions at the University of Waterloo and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

Lloyd Danzig, a leading expert in the field of Artificial Intelligence, explores ethical issues of automation. Lloyd is the Chairman & Founder of the International Consortium for the Ethical Development of Artificial Intelligence, a non-profit NGO dedicated to ensuring that rapid developments in A.I. are made with a keen eye toward the long-term interests of humanity.

He is a distinguished member of CompTIA’s AI Advisory Council, through which the world’s 20 most influential thought leaders establish best practices to foster technological development while protecting consumers.