Because our most powerful classical computers are limited in the chemical modeling they can perform, so are the solutions they can unlock.

Quantum computing could change that.

On this episode of Quantum Impact, Dr. Krysta Svore, general manager of quantum systems and software at Microsoft, heads to Richland, Washington to meet with Dr. Nathan Baker and Dr. Bojana Ginovska at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Microsoft is partnering with PNNL to bring the power of quantum to our understanding of chemistry. One of PNNL’s areas of interest is catalysis, or the process of converting chemicals from one form to another, and Nathan shares the complexity involved in truly understanding that process.

Bojana, a computational chemist, then speaks with Krysta about her work studying nitrogenase, an enzyme present in healthy soil. She’s exploring how we can turn nitrogen into ammonia for agriculture in a way that doesn’t deplete our energy resources.

Together with PNNL, Microsoft is working to develop quantum algorithms to help solve challenging problems in chemistry, which will have hugely positive impacts on our world and our planet’s future.

80% of ocean plastic comes from inland sources.

In this episode of CodeStories, learn about the Plastic Origins project, from Surfrider Foundation Europe, which tackles inland plastic pollution by monitoring microplastic and tracking the path of plastic waste as it travels to the ocean.

Episode index:

  • About Surfrider Foundation Europe
  • About AI School
  • Seine River, near Microsoft France office
  • How Plastic Origins is using AI and machine learning
  • Demo with Azure Machine Learning
  • How to get involved with the Plastic Origins project

Surfrider Foundation Europe would like to thank all the volunteers who contribute everyday to the success of the Plastic origins project. If you want to become one of them and join the project, write us at plasticorigins@surfrider.eu

Links from this episode: 

Here’s an interesting project to use AI to deal with nuclear waste.

The researchers leveraged physics-informed generative adversarial networks (“GANs”).

Nuclear waste storage sites are a subject of intense controversy and debate; nobody wants the radioactive remnants in their backyard. Now, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, Pacific Northwest National University (PNNL), Brown University and Nvidia has yielded new insights for nuclear waste remediation using the joint power of supercomputing […]

Each day around a third of all food harvested or produced around the globe is wasted. This means that about 1.3 billion tons of food feeds no one.  IKEA’s restaurants serve 680 million people each year and the company takes food waste seriously.  IKEA has enlisted AI in its sustainability efforts.

IKEA is a proponent of the “circular economy”, which is an economic system based on minimizing waste and making the most of resources. It is basically the opposite of taking materials, manufacturing products (or food), and then disposing of the end product. Instead it is a regenerative approach that reduces waste.

AI is the wonder of our age and the hottest tech of the 2010s, but does it hurt the environment?

For Emma Strubell, the lead author behind the paper, the most shocking discovery of the research was when she analyzed one of the recent models she designed as part of her PhD work at University of Massachusetts Amherst. While the algorithm’s carbon footprint–78,468 pounds of carbon dioxide–wasn’t quite as big as some of the others she assessed in the paper, it still was similar in size to the carbon dioxide that the average American emits in two years.

Earth Day may have been a week ago, but the earth is important every day. Here’s an interesting look at how AI can help save the planet in this article focusing on Intel’s efforts in this space.

Since 2017, Intel has been collaborating with Parley for the Oceans* and a team of marine biologists to collect the mucus exhaled from whales when they surface to breathe, then utilizing AI technology to analyze indicators or the whale’s health in real time. By developing a greater understand what’s threatening their ecosystem, we can better protect whales. Learn more about the Parley* SnotBot and see behind the scenes with the team working on the project.

As big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence are becoming a part of our every day lives and various industries, there is increasing evidence of how these technologies can contribute towards solving globally pressing issues such as deforestation. Here’s an interesting article looking at that very problem.

Advanced technologies such as AI and big data are being leveraged in the fight against deforestation. SilviaTerra is using AI to monitor forests. SilviaTerra has a software-based approach to solve forest inventory problems by assessing forests using satellite imagery and machine learning. The algorithm, powered by AI, is enabling precision forestry at a fraction of time, fieldwork and cost of conventional methods.