Wide deployment of AI systems will up end the labor market and economy in ways we can barely yet imagine. Think of what someone from 1919 would think of Amazon, Facebook, or convenience stores.

Economists have been studying the relationship between technological change, productivity, and employment for a few centuries now.

Naturally, the rise of AI applications from driving cars to tumor detection in medical scans has now become a focus of their attention.

In September 2017, a group of distinguished economists gathered in Toronto to set out a research agenda for the Economics of Artificial Intelligence (AI). They covered questions such as what is economically unique about AI, what will be its impacts, and what are the right policies to enhance its benefits.

We are in the midst of transforming every industry.

Here’s a great overview (from an financial angle) on how AI is transforming the food processing industry.

Food processing is a complex industry, encompassing everything, from sorting raw materials, following the right production process, maintaining machinery to ensuring that the final product is on par with standards. But now, food processing can be easily monitored by AI-powered applications that not only do what humans do but […]

While grabbing coffee at a recently renovated McDonald’s, Frank ponders the future of work: both low-skill and higher skill work. There’s going to be no hiding from this: we are truly on the Eve of Disruption, where AI will impact everyone everywhere.It’s not all gloom and doom and there might be a strategy to survive and even thrive now and in the next economy.  Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

In this interview with Geoffrey Hinton, Martin Ford asks the pioneering AI researcher about the economics of a world dominated by AI and what to do about making sure the future is for everyone.

If you can dramatically increase productivity and make more goodies to go around, that should be a good thing. Whether or not it turns out to be a good thing depends entirely on the social system, and doesn’t depend at all on the technology. People are looking at the technology as if the technological advances are a problem. The problem is in the social systems, and whether we’re going to have a social system that shares fairly, or one that focuses all the improvement on the 1% and treats the rest of the people like dirt. That’s nothing to do with technology.