The danger of artificial intelligence isn’t that it’s going to rebel against us, but that it’s going to do exactly what we ask it to do, says AI researcher Janelle Shane.

From the video description:

Sharing the weird, sometimes alarming antics of AI algorithms as they try to solve human problems — like creating new ice cream flavors or recognizing cars on the road — Shane shows why AI doesn’t yet measure up to real brains.

Wide deployment of AI systems will up end the labor market and economy in ways we can barely yet imagine. Think of what someone from 1919 would think of Amazon, Facebook, or convenience stores.

Economists have been studying the relationship between technological change, productivity, and employment for a few centuries now.

Naturally, the rise of AI applications from driving cars to tumor detection in medical scans has now become a focus of their attention.

In September 2017, a group of distinguished economists gathered in Toronto to set out a research agenda for the Economics of Artificial Intelligence (AI). They covered questions such as what is economically unique about AI, what will be its impacts, and what are the right policies to enhance its benefits.

Jamie Paik explores more creative forms of robots.

From the video description:

Taking design cues from origami, robotician Jamie Paik and her team created “robogamis”: folding robots made out super-thin materials that can reshape and transform themselves. In this talk and tech demo, Paik shows how robogamis could adapt to achieve a variety of tasks on earth (or in space) and demonstrates how they roll, jump, catapult like a slingshot and even pulse like a beating heart.

In the post-Amazon economy, all brick and mortar retailers are struggling. Some have outright failed and others on the brink. However, there are a few outliers that refuse to go down without a fight and are actually innovating.In this DataPoint, Frank notes one that has actually turned physical location to its advantage by helping Amazon process returns! 

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I’ve always wondered that with advances in material sciences and production methods how will the design of buildings change. Bjarke Ingels talks about the future of architecture, floating cities, and LEGOs in this TED talk.