Commercially viable quantum computing could be here sooner than you think, thanks to a new innovation that shrinks quantum tech down onto a chip: a cryochip.

Seeker explains:

It seems like quantum computers will likely be a big part of our computing future—but getting them to do anything super useful has been famously difficult. Lots of new technologies are aiming to get commercially viable quantum computing here just a little bit faster, including one innovation that shrinks quantum technology down onto a chip.

A quantum computer isn’t just a more powerful version of the computers we use today; it’s something else entirely, based on emerging scientific understanding — and more than a bit of uncertainty.

Enter the quantum wonderland with TED Fellow Shohini Ghose and learn how this technology holds the potential to transform medicine, create unbreakable encryption and even teleport information.

Can’t get enough? Here’s another video.

Microsoft’s Project Silica aims to show that glass is the future of long-term data storage.

To prove its usefulness outside the lab, Microsoft partnered with Warner Bros. to write the 1978 Superman film into glass with lasers.

To see the whole process and the Superman glass, CNET visited Microsoft’s Research Lab in Cambridge, England and Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, California.

Vern Brownell, CEO, D-Wave Systems, takes the stage to talk about the change that Quantum computing will make in the world, and it will be the complementary to A.I. and machine learning.#WorldGovSummit

“Quantum computing addresses possibilities that are incomprehensible with the most sophisticated supercomputers of today”