We typically imagine robots looking like humans, but there’s a real advantage to other “form factors” that mimic pack animals.

For example, check out this new robot that MIT just made: a mini cheetah robot, the first four-legged robot to do a backflip.

At only 20 pounds the limber quadruped can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right side up or upside down. More practically, the robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person’s walking speed.

In this video of a keynote presentation, Jeremy Gutsche dives into artificial intelligence and the AI mechanized future in an AI talk that explores how artificial intelligence trends will change your future, particularly as you combine innovation in AI with robotics, interface, bio enhancement, 3d printing, mind reading, sustainability and thought control.

I know that after my experience last week, that I am ready for a world of self-driving cars. Oddly enough, just last week, Waymo rolled out a driverless taxi service called Waymo One in Arizona. The company has been operating self-driving cars, occasionally without safety drivers behind the wheel, for about a year and half now.

The goal is to use all the data they have collected to make Waymo’s autonomous vehicles the safest drivers on the road. Andrew Hawkins from The Verge went down to Chandler, Arizona for a test ride.

Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as “smart” as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: “Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make.” A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we’re building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own?