With data storage demands increasing every day, conventional storage will not be enough in the future. Enter DNA-based storage, with its ability to store information on a molecular level, it could revolutionize data storage in the age beyond big data. And researchers have recently came one step closer to making this technology real.

Researchers at Microsoft and the late Microsoft founder Paul Allen’s school of computing science at the University of Washington has built a system of liquids, tubes, syringes, and electronics around a benchtop to deliver the world’s first automated DNA storage device.

DeepMind is definitely at the top of its game with cutting edge projects like AlphaGo, AlphaStar, and, most recently, AlphaFold, but it has even bigger plans. Curiously, it will retain control of any AGI it creates. Granted, an AGI is still years, maybe even decades away. I do, however, find it interesting that DeepMind is already planning a corporate power struggle.

Very Blade Runner-esque, don’t you think?

DeepMind — quite prominently — claims to be the “world leader in artificial intelligence research.” AlphaGo and AlphaStar certainly lend credence to that title, but the Alphabet division’s end goal is artificial general intelligence (AGI). If it ever achieves that landmark accomplishment, DeepMind — and not its parent company — will reportedly retain control.

In this interview with Geoffrey Hinton, Martin Ford asks the pioneering AI researcher about the economics of a world dominated by AI and what to do about making sure the future is for everyone.

If you can dramatically increase productivity and make more goodies to go around, that should be a good thing. Whether or not it turns out to be a good thing depends entirely on the social system, and doesn’t depend at all on the technology. People are looking at the technology as if the technological advances are a problem. The problem is in the social systems, and whether we’re going to have a social system that shares fairly, or one that focuses all the improvement on the 1% and treats the rest of the people like dirt. That’s nothing to do with technology.

We typically imagine robots looking like humans, but there’s a real advantage to other “form factors” that mimic pack animals.

For example, check out this new robot that MIT just made: a mini cheetah robot, the first four-legged robot to do a backflip.

At only 20 pounds the limber quadruped can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right side up or upside down. More practically, the robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person’s walking speed.