How far can you go with ONLY language modeling?

Can a large enough language model perform NLP task out of the box?

OpenAI take on these and other questions by training a transformer that is an order of magnitude larger than anything that has ever been built before and the results are astounding.

Yannic Kilcher explores.

Paper

Time index:

  • 0:00 – Intro & Overview
  • 1:20 – Language Models
  • 2:45 – Language Modeling Datasets
  • 3:20 – Model Size
  • 5:35 – Transformer Models
  • 7:25 – Fine Tuning
  • 10:15 – In-Context Learning
  • 17:15 – Start of Experimental Results
  • 19:10 – Question Answering
  • 23:10 – What I think is happening
  • 28:50 – Translation
  • 31:30 – Winograd Schemes
  • 33:00 – Commonsense Reasoning
  • 37:00 – Reading Comprehension
  • 37:30 – SuperGLUE
  • 40:40 – NLI
  • 41:40 – Arithmetic Expressions
  • 48:30 – Word Unscrambling
  • 50:30 – SAT Analogies
  • 52:10 – News Article Generation
  • 58:10 – Made-up Words
  • 1:01:10 – Training Set Contamination
  • 1:03:10 – Task Exampleshttps://arxiv.org/abs/2005.14165
    https://github.com/openai/gpt-3

Computers just got a lot better at mimicking human language. Researchers created computer programs that can write long passages of coherent, original text.

Language models like GPT-2, Grover, and CTRL create text passages that seem written by someone fluent in the language, but not in the truth. That AI field, Natural Language Processing (NLP), didn’t exactly set out to create a fake news machine. Rather, it’s the byproduct of a line of research into massive pretrained language models: Machine learning programs that store vast statistical maps of how we use our language. So far, the technology’s creative uses seem to outnumber its malicious ones. But it’s not difficult to imagine how these text-fakes could cause harm, especially as these models become widely shared and deployable by anyone with basic know-how.

Read more here: https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/3/4/21163743/ai-language-generation-fake-text-gpt2