Artificial intelligence (AI) can help us do stuff like finding a specific photo in our photos app, or translating signs into another language.

What if we applied the same technology to really big problems in areas like healthcare?

Google’s Dr. Lily Peng describes her journey from medicine to technology and outlines the potential of AI in healthcare, describing how her team trained an AI algorithm to detect diabetic eye disease in medical images to help doctors in India prevent millions of people from getting blind. Dr. Lily Peng is a doctor by training and now works with a team of doctors, scientists, and engineers at Google Health who use AI for medical imaging, to increase the availability and accuracy of care. Some of her team’s recent work includes building models to detect diabetic eye disease, predict cardiovascular health factors, and identify breast and lung cancer.

RNZ interviews Jacob Glanville, one of the stars of Netflix documentary Pandemic. He runs Distributed Bio which has been working to find an antibody therapy.

Yesterday he tweeted we should get ready for a positive announcement this week. He joins Lisa Owen via Skype from San Francisco.Scientists around the world have been racing to develop treatments, cures and a vaccine for COVID-19 – and are getting closer by the day.

Here’s an interesting interview that Ed Mylett posted.

Ending the stigma and idea of Mental Illness and cutting edge strategies for a healthy brain!

Mental health can be a touchy subject for all of us. Whether you are enduring it personally, watching a loved one go through it, or are struggling to understand it at all, it is a subject that has affected millions of lives directly and indirectly.

Because of its impact and the general lack of understanding surrounding this topic, I brought in the BEST of the BEST to answer your burning questions and to provide clarity to the issues that have been circling in your mind.

Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records, which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information.

This creates both opportunities and privacy concerns. The Wall Street Journal takes a closer look.