Geofencing has many practical applications. A geofence is a virtual boundary defining an area on a map. Using tools in Azure Maps, Jim demos how to test if a coordinate is inside or outside the Microsoft Redmond campus boundary.

It can be used to send an alert if an expensive piece of machinery leaves a construction site unexpectedly or to send a warning if a worker enters an unsafe location within a factory.

Jim Bennett shows us how to code geofencing applications with Visual Studio, Python, and Azure Maps.

Jim explains why and how to manage a buffer around your geofence boundary. (Hint: GPS is not that accurate!) He also demos how to set a notification using a web hook and an Azure Logic App when a person or item enters or leaves a geofence area.

Next steps:

Step through the tutorial: Set up a geofence by using Azure Maps

Visit Jim’s blog on geofencing: are you where you should be?

This week James Montemagno is joined by Jim Bennett, a Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft, who shows us how to use AI inside a mobile app to identify his daughters’ toys.

In the video below, he walks through using the Azure custom vision service to generate a model to identify different toys, then shows how you can use these models from inside your app, both remotely by calling an Azure service, or locally by running the model on your device using CoreML and Tensorflow.

Show Links: