Recently, Amazon announced that it will spend $700 Million (USD) to retrain its employees. Why are they doing this? Simple: automation. They know that a displaced workforce would be bad political mojo at a time when the giant is facing increasing calls for regulation, even potential anti-trust action.Anti-trust laws in the US were made largely in reaction to the Standard Oil Company and its founder John D. Rockefeller.In this DataPoint, Frank notes how Jeff Bezos just may be the Rockefeller of our day.

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

Industrial robots have been around for decades. What will happen when they are connected to AI? What will the job market look like and how will entire industries change?

If we were to ask where the combination of robotics and AI can provide industrial transformation, the immediate view in many people’s minds is the direct replacement of human workers, for example in picking strawberries. This is only a part of the picture, significant gains are also enabled by replacing or upgrading existing machines (see our welding example above), by augmenting human capabilities (such as by presetting no-go zones in robotic surgery) and by opening completely new options that previously were not possible (for example micro surgery robots may need to make their own decisions due to difficulty in communicating with them inside the body).

Here’s an interesting read on the importance of re-skilling the workforce to be ready when the robots and/or algorithms take away many (all?) of the jobs.

Recently, Amazon floated the idea that it would be fully automated in a decade: Not all of the 125,000 people who work at Amazon warehouses have to worry about losing their jobs to robots — not for 10 years or so, anyways. On Tuesday, Scott Anderson, director of Amazon […]

Doctor Who recently released an episode looking at a future where robots took up most of the workforce. In that reality, companies had to hit a “biological quota” of 10% of their employees being human. A silly, unrealistic future, right?

Well, maybe not. Recent research from RS Online has found there’s a very real possibility of robotic replacements coming to take jobs away from living, breathing people by the year 2030.

Worried about the concept of Wall-E or K9 coming in to take over your role? The study found the following sectors were the most at risk of one of these metallic employees taking their spot:

  • Retail. Where 44% of jobs were at risk.
  • Admin. Where 37% of roles could be taken.
  • Manufacturing. Where 46% of positions could be up for grabs.

Are you worried about where your future is headed? Make sure to put yourself in a position which makes you irreplaceable across the next 10 years if you’re worried about the threat of a robotic revolution.

To find out more about the growth of artificial intelligence, be sure to check out the fascinating infographic below.

In light of the recent Data Driven podcast episode on preparing workers for the coming AI storm,

Joseph Fuller, professor at Harvard Business School, says that the story we hear about workers being afraid for the future of their jobs might not be right. In surveying 11,000 people in lower-income and middle-skills jobs and 6,500 managers across 11 countries, Fuller discovered that, contrary to what bosses believe, many employees are excited about new technologies and willing to be trained in new skills.

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page

Sure, the hype around “the robots taking all our jobs” is reaching fever pitch. However, the next buzzword in this space will be “reskilling.”

Reskilling: If you currently have employees who are business analysts or have experience with data engineering, then they could be good candidates to train for AI tasks. This would include focusing on skills like Python and TensorFlow, which is a deep learning framework.

Here’s an interesting look at how far enterprises are planning to go with AI.

62% of organizations are using automation to eliminate transactional work and replace repetitive tasks, 47% are also augmenting existing work practices to improve productivity, and 36% are “reimagining work;” 84% said that automation would require reskilling and reported that they are increasing funding for reskilling and retraining, with 18% characterizing this investment as “significant;” In 10 years, 20-30% of jobs will be ‘superjobs,’ 10-20% will be low-wage, low-skill jobs, and the middle 60-70% will be ‘hybrid jobs’ that require both technical and soft skills;