In light of the recent Data Driven podcast episode on preparing workers for the coming AI storm,

Joseph Fuller, professor at Harvard Business School, says that the story we hear about workers being afraid for the future of their jobs might not be right. In surveying 11,000 people in lower-income and middle-skills jobs and 6,500 managers across 11 countries, Fuller discovered that, contrary to what bosses believe, many employees are excited about new technologies and willing to be trained in new skills.

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page

Sure, the hype around “the robots taking all our jobs” is reaching fever pitch. However, the next buzzword in this space will be “reskilling.”

Reskilling: If you currently have employees who are business analysts or have experience with data engineering, then they could be good candidates to train for AI tasks. This would include focusing on skills like Python and TensorFlow, which is a deep learning framework.

Here’s an interesting look at how far enterprises are planning to go with AI.

62% of organizations are using automation to eliminate transactional work and replace repetitive tasks, 47% are also augmenting existing work practices to improve productivity, and 36% are “reimagining work;” 84% said that automation would require reskilling and reported that they are increasing funding for reskilling and retraining, with 18% characterizing this investment as “significant;” In 10 years, 20-30% of jobs will be ‘superjobs,’ 10-20% will be low-wage, low-skill jobs, and the middle 60-70% will be ‘hybrid jobs’ that require both technical and soft skills;

In this Data Point, Frank ponders the wider impact on jobs and businesses related to self-driving cars that are not immediately obvious. From driving schools to truck stops, everyone will feel the change.The question then becomes: how can we prepare the workforce for the impending upheaval in the job market? Will teaching to the test cut it? Or are we going to have to make learning play and play learning?

Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

Show Notes:

Last week, I spoke to a group of high school students about careers in STEM. Aside from being happy that STEM is now encouraged, I pointed out to them that the workforce they will be entering may look different than the one they see now.  By the time they hit the workforce, digital transformation will have made short work of companies that have not become data driven. The only surviving and thriving companies will be the one who adapted quickly. 

Proving that point is this article from TechRepublic and helpful advice on how to stay ahead of the robots.

Here’s an interesting video related to the article:

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While grabbing coffee at a recently renovated McDonald’s, Frank ponders the future of work: both low-skill and higher skill work. There’s going to be no hiding from this: we are truly on the Eve of Disruption, where AI will impact everyone everywhere.It’s not all gloom and doom and there might be a strategy to survive and even thrive now and in the next economy.  Press the play button below to listen here or visit the show page at DataDriven.tv

According to a new report by Indeed, there’ s a new top job in America and it’s a pretty cool gig if I do say so myself.

Machine learning engineer is the best job of 2019, according to an Indeed report released Thursday. With an average base salary of $146,085 and an impressive 344% growth in job postings, machine learning engineers are expected to continue on this growth track in the coming years, the report found, [Read more on TechRepublic]