The world is moving faster. More content. More things to learn. The best way to make the most of this information age is to learn how to learn. In this video, AI genius and modern-day renaissance man, Siraj Raval reveals 10 learning techniques that I personally use to educate himself on complex topics in Science, engineering, technology, and mathematics.

Here’s an interesting bit of career advice and resources for those looking to learn AI and machine learning for their career. Who am I to argue with Mark Cuban? 😉

Two years have already passed since Mark Cuban said that if you don’t understand artificial intelligence, deep learning, and machine learning “you’re going to be a dinosaur within three years.” If you still didn’t dig yourself into that knowledge, especially if you’re a developer, then you’ve got about a year left to see whether he was right or not.

One of the questions I get asked most frequently is how I so quickly changed from a “plain old software engineer” to “certified Data Scientist” as quickly as I did. While I do plan to write a book/shoot a video on the topic. In the meantime, enjoy this video from Siraj Raval where he shows the techniques he uses to study machine learning. It’s a fast moving field with lots of crazy math, so the old ways of learning just won’t cut it.

That includes living a healthy lifestyles, optimizing your learning environment, creating a personalized learning path, prioritizing effectively, and being an active learner. He demos the FAST technique, which you can use to help learn faster and more efficiently. While this with made with machine learning technology in mind, but these techniques can be used for any field.

As someone who has spent the last two years working on getting as any certification in data science as I possibly can, many people ask me, “How did you learn so much so fast?”

The answer is simple: study the brain, how it learns, and then test out new ways to learn faster.

In this video, Barbara Oakley explains how the brain is constantly fluctuating between a “learning” mode and an “understanding” mode.

When you’re sitting there reading (and re-reading!) a textbook, unable to make sense of it, your brain is actually learning. It just takes the decompressing part of your brain for it to all be unpacked. It’s called the neural chunk theory and you can learn to utilize it to your advantage by learning how to study differently; small bursts of inactivity and breaks can really make a big difference in how to memorize seemingly difficult information by combining bigger and bigger “chunks” of information until you understand the big picture. It’s fascinating stuff