Siraj Raval  interviews Vinod Khosla in the latest edition of his podcast.

Vinod Khosla is an Entrepreneur, Venture Capitalist, and Philanthropist. It was an honor to have a conversation with the Silicon Valley legend that I’ve admired for many years. Vinod co-founded Sun Microsystems over 30 years ago, a company that grew to over 36,000 employees and invented so much foundational software technology like the Java programming language, NFS, and they pretty much mainstreamed the ‘idea’ of open source. After a successful exit, he’s been using his billionaire status to invest in ambitious technologists trying to improve human life. He’s got the coolest investment portfolio I’ve seen yet, and in this hour long interview we discuss everything from AI to education to startup culture. I know that my microphone volume should be higher in this one, I’ll fix that the next podcast. Enjoy!

Show Notes:

Time markers of our discussion topics below:

2:55 The Future of Education
4:36 Vinod’s Dream of an AI Tutor
5:50 Vinod Offers Siraj a Job
6:35 Choose your Teacher with DeepFakes
8:04 Mathematical Models
9:10 Books Vinod Loves
11:00 What is Learning?
14:00 The Flaws of Liberal Arts Degrees
16:10 Indian Culture
21:11 A Day in the Life of Vinod Khosla
23:50 Valuing Brutal Honesty
24:30 Distributed File Storage
30:30 Where are we Headed?
33:32 Vinod on Nick Bostrom
38:00 Vinod’s Rockstar Recruiting Ability
43:00 The Next Industries to Disrupt
49:00 Vinod Offers Siraj Funding for an AI Tutor
51:48 Virtual Reality
52:00 Contrarian Beliefs
54:00 Vinod’s Love of Learning
55:30 USA vs China

Vinod’s ‘Awesome’ Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STtAsDCKEck

Khosla Ventures Blog posts:
https://www.khoslaventures.com/blog/all

Books we discussed:

Scale by Geoffrey West:
https://amzn.to/2rs7UV7

Factfulness by Hans Roesling:
https://amzn.to/2GHUlgg

Mindset by Carol Dwicke:
https://amzn.to/2icCNey

36 Dramatic Situations by Mike Figgis:
https://amzn.to/2ol14Vi

Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari:
https://amzn.to/2amA7J5

21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari:
https://amzn.to/2PKIJZY
 
The Third Pillar by Raghuram R:
https://bit.ly/2ASU98K

Zero to One by Peter Thiel:
https://amzn.to/2ae3NTM

Dani, a game developer, recently made a game and decided to train an AI to play it.

A couple of weeks ago I made a video “Making a Game in ONE Day (12 Hours)”, and today I’m trying to teach an A.I to play my game!

Basically I’m gonna use Neural Networks to make the A.I learn to play my game.

This is something I’ve always wanted to do, and I’m really happy I finally got around to do it. Some of the biggest inspirations for this is obviously carykh, Jabrils & Codebullet!

Siraj Raval shares his secrets for learning new skills rapidly and how he has fun in the process.

I’m going to show you a day in my life in this episode. These are the daily habits that I practice to optimize my ability to learn and thus serve you better. I consider my body an input/output machine, so in order to optimize my output (educational content), I’ve got to optimize the input (my physical/mental health). My job is to educate the public on how relatively complex technologies work, and this requires me to learn a lot really fast. I’ve learned that large gains can be made in my ability to learn just my making small gains in a few different habits. The effects compound over time, that’s how habits tend to work. You might not notice the effect of any one of these habits immediately, but put them all together and follow them with sustained enthusiasm. I promise you, eventually you’re going to start seeing results. Try it for 30 days and see for yourself. Enjoy!

The world is moving faster. More content. More things to learn. The best way to make the most of this information age is to learn how to learn. In this video, AI genius and modern-day renaissance man, Siraj Raval reveals 10 learning techniques that I personally use to educate himself on complex topics in Science, engineering, technology, and mathematics.

Here’s an interesting bit of career advice and resources for those looking to learn AI and machine learning for their career. Who am I to argue with Mark Cuban? 😉

Two years have already passed since Mark Cuban said that if you don’t understand artificial intelligence, deep learning, and machine learning “you’re going to be a dinosaur within three years.” If you still didn’t dig yourself into that knowledge, especially if you’re a developer, then you’ve got about a year left to see whether he was right or not.

One of the questions I get asked most frequently is how I so quickly changed from a “plain old software engineer” to “certified Data Scientist” as quickly as I did. While I do plan to write a book/shoot a video on the topic. In the meantime, enjoy this video from Siraj Raval where he shows the techniques he uses to study machine learning. It’s a fast moving field with lots of crazy math, so the old ways of learning just won’t cut it.

That includes living a healthy lifestyles, optimizing your learning environment, creating a personalized learning path, prioritizing effectively, and being an active learner. He demos the FAST technique, which you can use to help learn faster and more efficiently. While this with made with machine learning technology in mind, but these techniques can be used for any field.

As someone who has spent the last two years working on getting as any certification in data science as I possibly can, many people ask me, “How did you learn so much so fast?”

The answer is simple: study the brain, how it learns, and then test out new ways to learn faster.

In this video, Barbara Oakley explains how the brain is constantly fluctuating between a “learning” mode and an “understanding” mode.

When you’re sitting there reading (and re-reading!) a textbook, unable to make sense of it, your brain is actually learning. It just takes the decompressing part of your brain for it to all be unpacked. It’s called the neural chunk theory and you can learn to utilize it to your advantage by learning how to study differently; small bursts of inactivity and breaks can really make a big difference in how to memorize seemingly difficult information by combining bigger and bigger “chunks” of information until you understand the big picture. It’s fascinating stuff