Lex Fridman interviews Peter Norvig.

Peter Norvig is a research director at Google and the co-author with Stuart Russell of the book Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach that educated and inspired a whole generation of researchers.

EPISODE LINKS:

OUTLINE:

  • 0:00 – Introduction
  • 0:37 – Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
  • 9:11 – Covering the entire field of AI
  • 15:42 – Expert systems and knowledge representation
  • 18:31 – Explainable AI
  • 23:15 – Trust
  • 25:47 – Education – Intro to AI – MOOC
  • 32:43 – Learning to program in 10 years
  • 37:12 – Changing nature of mastery
  • 40:01 – Code review
  • 41:17 – How have you changed as a programmer
  • 43:05 – LISP
  • 47:41 – Python
  • 48:32 – Early days of Google Search
  • 53:24 – What does it take to build human-level intelligence
  • 55:14 – Her
  • 57:00 – Test of intelligence
  • 58:41 – Future threats from AI
  • 1:00:58 – Exciting open problems in AI

Leonard Susskind is a professor of theoretical physics at Stanford University, and founding director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

He is widely regarded as one of the fathers of string theory and in general as one of the greatest physicists of our time both as a researcher and an educator.

This conversation is part of Lex Fridman’s Artificial Intelligence podcast.

Regina Barzilay is a professor at MIT and a world-class researcher in natural language processing and applications of deep learning to chemistry and oncology, or the use of deep learning for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cancer.

She has also been recognized for her teaching of several successful AI-related courses at MIT, including the popular Introduction to Machine Learning course. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast run by Lex Fridman.

Lex Fridman sits down with Colin Angle, the CEO and co-founder of iRobot.

iRobot is robotics company that for 29 years has been creating robots that operate successfully in the real world, not as a demo or on a scale of dozens, but on a scale of thousands and millions.

As of this year, iRobot has sold more than 25 million robots to consumers, including the Roomba vacuum cleaning robot, the Braava floor mopping robot, and soon the Terra lawn mowing robot. 25 million robots successfully operating autonomously in people’s homes to me is an incredible accomplishment of science, engineering, logistics, and all kinds of entrepreneurial innovation.

Vijay Kumar is one of the top roboticists in the world, professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Dean of Penn Engineering, former director of GRASP lab, or the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception Laboratory at Penn that was established back in 1979, 40 years ago.

Vijay is perhaps best known for his work in multi-robot systems (or robot swarms) and micro aerial vehicles, robots that elegantly cooperate in flight under all the uncertainty and challenges that real-world conditions present.

This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast run by Lex Fridman.

Lex Fridman interviews Keoki Jackson, he CTO of Lockheed Martin.

Lockheed Martin is a company that through its long history has created some of the most incredible engineering marvels that human beings have ever built, including planes that fly fast and undetected, defense systems that intersect threats that could take the lives of millions in the case of nuclear weapons, and spacecraft systems that venture out into space, the moon, Mars, and beyond with and without humans on-board.

In this episode of the AI Podcast, Lex Fridman interviews Paola Arlotta.

Paola Arlotta is a professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University.

You could say that she studies “naturally intelligent” systems.

Specifically, she is interested in understanding the molecular laws that govern the birth, differentiation and assembly of the human brain’s cerebral cortex. She explores the complexity of the brain by studying and engineering elements of how the brain develops.

Lex Fridman sits down with George Hotz, the founder of Comma.ai, a machine learning based vehicle automation company.

He is an outspoken personality in the field of AI and technology in general. He first gained recognition for being the first person to carrier-unlock an iPhone, and since then has done quite a few interesting things at the intersection of hardware and software. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.