I do not envy anyone who has to stand guard in front of a business and enforce any mask wearing policies.

What if this task could be automated?

Well, here’s an article that shows you how to set up a Raspberry Pi Face Mask Detection System and sound an alarm when someone is not wearing their face mask.

This project was inspired by a video of a mall in Asia where an entry gate could only be activated by a user wearing a face mask.

When a user approaches your webcam, the Python code utilizing TensorFlow, OpenCV, and imutils packages will detect if a user is wearing a face mask or not. Users not wearing a face mask will be designated with a red box around their face, and users wearing a face mask will see a green box around their face with the text, “Thank you. Mask On.” Users not wearing a face mask will see a red box around their face with, “No Face Mask Detected.”

The 3D Handyman shares an interesting technique to address the mask shortage in light of the COVID pandemic.

However, there are safety concerns you should take seriously. Highlights added.

I’m sharing this video here to inspire folks to use the tools and expertise at their disposal to fight this awful disease.

Your safety is no joke! Read all this information!

WARNING! The activated carbon layer of the MERV 16 filter used in this video appears to contain fiberglass!

Other home air filters may also contain Fiberglass! Do not use fiberglass based materials for breathing devices! One possible test is if you can melt the filter material into a plastic blob with a standard lighter it is likely a synthetic material. If the material can not be melted, there is a high likelihood that it is fiberglass. That said, it can be very difficult to determine what these filters are made of and some may be a small percentage fiberglass. Use extreme caution when making any type of breathing device! Emailing the manufacturer may be the only way to find out what the filter is made out of.

There are lots of materials that can be loaded into this and other 3D printed mask designs. According to “tests at Missouri University and University of Virginia, scientists found that vacuum bags removed between 60 percent and 87 percent of particles.” This article also mentions “A 600 thread count pillow case captured just 22 percent of particles when doubled, but four layers captured nearly 60 percent.” This may indicate that a double layer of a MERV 12 filter (or lesser rated filters) may have much better filtration performance than just a single layer. ALSO “The problem with air filters is that they potentially could shed small fibers that would be risky to inhale. So if you want to use a filter, you need to sandwich the filter between two layers of cotton fabric.” Good advice! https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/05/well/live/coronavirus-homemade-mask-material-DIY-face-mask-ppe.html

It appears many 3D printed masks do not have enough filter surface area and negate the manufacturer filtration ratings and can actually lead to CO2 build up in the mask cavity and in your body. This particular design appears to have enough surface area to function without these issues. However, keep this in mind and if you choose to wear a device like this

REMOVE IT if you feel light headed, dizzy, headache, confusion, etc. (Carbon Dioxide Poisoning) and NEVER wear a mask while sleeping.

Time Index:

  • 0:00 – Intro and Basic Concept
  • 3:00 – Method and Materials
  • 8:38 – Design
  • 14:39 – 3D Print
  • 16:08 – Closer Look at the Design (Animation)
  • 17:07 – Finishing and Assembly
  • 20:27 – Testing and Review
  • 25:02 – Cost and Conclusions