Machines can help doctors by spotting abnormalities in X-rays or MRA scans that the physicians themselves may have missed. AI can also help physicians by analyzing data and, through the use of algorithms, produce possible diagnoses.

The hope is that this freed up time, as doctors make their rounds, can help physicians establish better connections with their patients, which in turn can lead to better treatment plans.

Here’s another story of how big data and high performance computing and TensorFlow is reshaping medicine as we know it.

Virtual drug screening has the potential to accelerate the development of new treatments. Using molecular docking, molecular dynamics and other algorithms, researchers can quickly screen for new drug candidates. This saves the enormous expense and time that would have been required to make the same conclusions about those candidates in the lab and in clinical trials.

AI is set to disrupt every field and every industry. Healthcare, in particular, seems primed for disruption. Here’s an interesting project out of Stanford.

“One of the really exciting things about computer vision is that it’s this powerful measuring tool,” said Yeung, who will be joining the faculty of Stanford’s department of biomedical data science this summer. “It can watch what’s happening in the hospital setting continuously, 24/7, and it never gets tired.”

Current methods for documenting patient movement are burdensome and ripe for human error, so this team is devising a new way that relies on computer vision technology similar to that in self-driving cars. Sensors in a hospital room capture patient motions as silhouette-like moving images, and a trained algorithm identifies the activity — whether a patient is being moved into or out of bed, for example, or into or out of a chair.

It sounds like science fiction: a device that can reconnect a paralyzed person’s brain to his or her body. But that’s exactly what the experimental NeuroLife system does. Developed by Battelle and Ohio State University,

NeuroLife uses a brain implant, an algorithm and an electrode sleeve to give paralysis patients back control of their limbs. For Ian Burkhart, NeuroLife’s first test subject, the implications could be life-changing.