Because our most powerful classical computers are limited in the chemical modeling they can perform, so are the solutions they can unlock.

Quantum computing could change that.

On this episode of Quantum Impact, Dr. Krysta Svore, general manager of quantum systems and software at Microsoft, heads to Richland, Washington to meet with Dr. Nathan Baker and Dr. Bojana Ginovska at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Microsoft is partnering with PNNL to bring the power of quantum to our understanding of chemistry. One of PNNL’s areas of interest is catalysis, or the process of converting chemicals from one form to another, and Nathan shares the complexity involved in truly understanding that process.

Bojana, a computational chemist, then speaks with Krysta about her work studying nitrogenase, an enzyme present in healthy soil. She’s exploring how we can turn nitrogen into ammonia for agriculture in a way that doesn’t deplete our energy resources.

Together with PNNL, Microsoft is working to develop quantum algorithms to help solve challenging problems in chemistry, which will have hugely positive impacts on our world and our planet’s future.

While quantum computing may seem like the next frontier, its foundations have actually been around for billions of years—in the natural world.

This episode of Quantum Impact explores the ways in which we can tap into nature’s organic systems and processes to help solve some of today’s most pressing issues around climate change and environmental sustainability.  

Krysta Svore, principal researcher at Microsoft, demonstrates the new Microsoft Quantum Development Kit.

The Quantum Development Kit makes it easy for you to start experimenting with quantum computing now and includes: · A native, quantum-focused programming language called Q# · Local and Azure-hosted simulators for you to test your Q# solution · And sample Q# code and libraries to help you get started

In this demo, she walks through a few code examples and explains where quantum principles like superposition and entanglement apply. She explains how quantum communication works using teleportation as your first “Hello World” inspired program. And keep watching to see more complex computations with molecular hydrogen.