Ever since my concussion three years ago, I have been fascinated by the brain and how to nourish it.

A major breakthrough in quantum tech allows us to see brain activity in far greater detail than ever before.

Pindex examines the fascinating research going on this space.

Big Think has a fascinating interview with Dr. Michio Kaku.

Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). He is the author of “The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth” (https://amzn.to/2lQyjy4)

In this video, Lex Fridman interviews Jeff Hawkins. He is the founder of Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience in 2002 and Numenta in 2005. In his 2004 book titled On Intelligence, and in his research before and after, he and his team have worked to reverse-engineer the neocortex and propose artificial intelligence architectures, approaches, and ideas that are inspired by the human brain. These ideas include Hierarchical Temporal Memory (HTM) from 2004 and The Thousand Brains Theory of Intelligence from 2017.

As someone who has spent the last two years working on getting as any certification in data science as I possibly can, many people ask me, “How did you learn so much so fast?”

The answer is simple: study the brain, how it learns, and then test out new ways to learn faster.

In this video, Barbara Oakley explains how the brain is constantly fluctuating between a “learning” mode and an “understanding” mode.

When you’re sitting there reading (and re-reading!) a textbook, unable to make sense of it, your brain is actually learning. It just takes the decompressing part of your brain for it to all be unpacked. It’s called the neural chunk theory and you can learn to utilize it to your advantage by learning how to study differently; small bursts of inactivity and breaks can really make a big difference in how to memorize seemingly difficult information by combining bigger and bigger “chunks” of information until you understand the big picture. It’s fascinating stuff