Scientists might have reached the theoretical limit of how strong this particular material can get, designing the first-ever super-light carbon nanostructure that’s stronger than diamond.

The latest development in the nanoworld of carbon comes from a team that has designed something called carbon plate-nanolattices. Under a scanning electron microscope, they look like little cubes, and the math indicated that this structure would be incredibly strong, but it’s been too difficult to actually make, until now.

The team’s success was made possible by a 3D printing process called two-photon polymerization direct laser writing, which is essentially 3D printing on the level of atoms and photons.

Find out more about this technique and what the result could mean for the future of medicine, electronics aerospace and more in this Elements.

This Seeker video explains.

CNBC takes a look at what’s next for the workspace based on what the big tech companies are doing.

Tech offices, from Apple’s 2.8 million square-foot “spaceship” campus, to Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters complete with a botanical garden, have always pushed the envelope of office space. But coronavirus may make this type of work environment a thing of the past, at least for the near future, as companies try to balance communal work with safety. Here’s a look at how tech companies are changing their offices and work policies as they ease into reopening. 

How far can you go with ONLY language modeling?

Can a large enough language model perform NLP task out of the box?

OpenAI take on these and other questions by training a transformer that is an order of magnitude larger than anything that has ever been built before and the results are astounding.

Yannic Kilcher explores.

Paper

Time index:

  • 0:00 – Intro & Overview
  • 1:20 – Language Models
  • 2:45 – Language Modeling Datasets
  • 3:20 – Model Size
  • 5:35 – Transformer Models
  • 7:25 – Fine Tuning
  • 10:15 – In-Context Learning
  • 17:15 – Start of Experimental Results
  • 19:10 – Question Answering
  • 23:10 – What I think is happening
  • 28:50 – Translation
  • 31:30 – Winograd Schemes
  • 33:00 – Commonsense Reasoning
  • 37:00 – Reading Comprehension
  • 37:30 – SuperGLUE
  • 40:40 – NLI
  • 41:40 – Arithmetic Expressions
  • 48:30 – Word Unscrambling
  • 50:30 – SAT Analogies
  • 52:10 – News Article Generation
  • 58:10 – Made-up Words
  • 1:01:10 – Training Set Contamination
  • 1:03:10 – Task Exampleshttps://arxiv.org/abs/2005.14165
    https://github.com/openai/gpt-3

Over the past decade, prices for solar panels and wind farms have reached all-time lows.

However, the price for lithium ion batteries, the leading energy storage technology, has remained high.

So researchers are exploring other alternatives, including flow batteries, thermal batteries, and gravity-based systems.

Commercially viable quantum computing could be here sooner than you think, thanks to a new innovation that shrinks quantum tech down onto a chip: a cryochip.

Seeker explains:

It seems like quantum computers will likely be a big part of our computing future—but getting them to do anything super useful has been famously difficult. Lots of new technologies are aiming to get commercially viable quantum computing here just a little bit faster, including one innovation that shrinks quantum technology down onto a chip.

The Infographics Show provides a look at the industries hit hardest by the COVID shutdown.

With nearly the whole world in quarantine, more business are being forced to close their doors, and some may never re-open. In today’s video we’re going to look at the industries affected most by the global pandemic. Places like hotels, music venues, and movie studios have all closed down. What ripple effects will these massive shut downs cause to the economy? Watch today’s informative video to find out which work places have been hit the hardest by this insane pandemic.

RNZ interviews Jacob Glanville, one of the stars of Netflix documentary Pandemic. He runs Distributed Bio which has been working to find an antibody therapy.

Yesterday he tweeted we should get ready for a positive announcement this week. He joins Lisa Owen via Skype from San Francisco.Scientists around the world have been racing to develop treatments, cures and a vaccine for COVID-19 – and are getting closer by the day.