Superconducting materials can do amazing things that appear to defy the laws of physics, but their major drawback is that superconducting properties don’t appear unless a material is cooled to near absolute zero.

Superconductors that would work at (or near)  room temperatures would, without exaggeration, would change the world and would have massive implications for quantum computing.   

Liv Boeree shares this exclusive behind-the-scenes interview with the scientists who just unearthed one of the holy grails of physics: a room-temperature superconductor!

Their discovered material — carbonaceous sulfur hydride — shows superconductivity at 15 degrees Celsius, a temperature FAR above all previous records. It takes us a huge step closer to the long-sought goal of creating electrical systems with perfect efficiency, which would transform the world’s energy grids, computation and transportation systems entirely.

 

Lex Fridman interviews Paul Krugman in the latest episode of his podcast.

Paul Krugman is a Nobel Prize winner in economics, professor at CUNY, and columnist at the New York Times. His academic work centers around international economics, economic geography, liquidity traps, and currency crises. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.

OUTLINE:
0:00 – Introduction
3:44 – Utopia from an economics perspective
4:51 – Competition
6:33 – Well-informed citizen
7:52 – Disagreements in economics
9:57 – Metrics of outcomes
13:00 – Safety nets
15:54 – Invisible hand of the market
21:43 – Regulation of tech sector
22:48 – Automation
25:51 – Metric of productivity
30:35 – Interaction of the economy and politics
33:48 – Universal basic income
36:40 – Divisiveness of political discourse
42:53 – Economic theories
52:25 – Starting a system on Mars from scratch
55:11 – International trade
59:08 – Writing in a time of radicalization and Twitter mobs