In this episode, Seeker tackles the question that’s on everyone’s minds: what will it take to have quantum internet in our home?

Yes, Virginia, a quantum internet is in the works.

The U.S. Department of Energy recently rolled out a blueprint describing research goals and engineering barriers on the way to quantum internet.

The DOE’s latest blueprint for a quantum internet in the U.S. has four key milestones. The first is to make sure quantum information sent over current fiber optic cables is secure. Then to establish entangled networks across colleges or cities, then throughout states, and finally for the whole country.

Commercially viable quantum computing could be here sooner than you think, thanks to a new innovation that shrinks quantum tech down onto a chip: a cryochip.

Seeker explains:

It seems like quantum computers will likely be a big part of our computing future—but getting them to do anything super useful has been famously difficult. Lots of new technologies are aiming to get commercially viable quantum computing here just a little bit faster, including one innovation that shrinks quantum technology down onto a chip.

Because our most powerful classical computers are limited in the chemical modeling they can perform, so are the solutions they can unlock.

Quantum computing could change that.

On this episode of Quantum Impact, Dr. Krysta Svore, general manager of quantum systems and software at Microsoft, heads to Richland, Washington to meet with Dr. Nathan Baker and Dr. Bojana Ginovska at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Microsoft is partnering with PNNL to bring the power of quantum to our understanding of chemistry. One of PNNL’s areas of interest is catalysis, or the process of converting chemicals from one form to another, and Nathan shares the complexity involved in truly understanding that process.

Bojana, a computational chemist, then speaks with Krysta about her work studying nitrogenase, an enzyme present in healthy soil. She’s exploring how we can turn nitrogen into ammonia for agriculture in a way that doesn’t deplete our energy resources.

Together with PNNL, Microsoft is working to develop quantum algorithms to help solve challenging problems in chemistry, which will have hugely positive impacts on our world and our planet’s future.

Seeker examines how research into quantum computing may uncover more about the universe.

Scientists have built an advanced instrument with parts from a quantum computer that’s sensitive enough to listen for the signal of a dark matter particle. The Axion Dark Matter Experiment (ADMX) at the University of Washington is the world’s first dark matter experiment that’s hunting specifically for axions.