Quantum computing is still in at the early stage. However, the technology is maturing rapidly.

To take advantage of tomorrow’s ultra-fast quantum machines, researchers will have to write specialized algorithms that can run on qubits instead of bits, and they’ll need equally specialized development tools to help with the task.

That’s where TensorFlow Quantum comes into the picture. It provides a set of operators, low-level programming building blocks, for creating AI models that work with qubits, quantum logic gates and quantum circuits. These operators abstract away some of the underlying complexity to reduce the amount of code researchers need to write.

This tutorial on TensorFlow.org implements a simplified Quantum Convolutional Neural Network (QCNN), a proposed quantum analogue to a classical convolutional neural network that is also translationally invariant.

Wow.

This tutorial implements a simplified Quantum Convolutional Neural Network (QCNN), a proposed quantum analogue to a classical convolutional neural network that is also translationally invariant . This example demonstrates how to detect certain properties of a quantum data source, such as a quantum sensor or a complex simulation from […]

Lex Fridman interviews Alex Garland, writer and director of many imaginative and philosophical films from the dreamlike exploration of human self-destruction in the movie Annihilation to the deep questions of consciousness and intelligence raised in the movie Ex Machina.

OUTLINE:
0:00 – Introduction
3:42 – Are we living in a dream?
7:15 – Aliens
12:34 – Science fiction: imagination becoming reality
17:29 – Artificial intelligence
22:40 – The new “Devs” series and the veneer of virtue in Silicon Valley
31:50 – Ex Machina and 2001: A Space Odyssey
44:58 – Lone genius
49:34 – Drawing inpiration from Elon Musk
51:24 – Space travel
54:03 – Free will
57:35 – Devs and the poetry of science
1:06:38 – What will you be remembered for?

Quantum technology has the potential to revolutionize whole fields of computing; from cryptography to molecular modelling. But how do quantum computers work? Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe

Join leading experts to untangle the quantum computing hype, at this event supported by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Lex Fridman  interviews Scott Aaronson,a professor at UT Austin, director of its Quantum Information Center, and previously a professor at MIT.

His research interests center around the capabilities and limits of quantum computers and computational complexity theory more generally. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.

OUTLINE:
0:00 – Introduction
5:07 – Role of philosophy in science
29:27 – What is a quantum computer?
41:12 – Quantum decoherence (noise in quantum information)
49:22 – Quantum computer engineering challenges
51:00 – Moore’s Law
56:33 – Quantum supremacy
1:12:18 – Using quantum computers to break cryptography
1:17:11 – Practical application of quantum computers
1:22:18 – Quantum machine learning, questinable claims, and cautious optimism
1:30:53 – Meaning of life

Krysta Svore, principal researcher at Microsoft, demonstrates the new Microsoft Quantum Development Kit.

The Quantum Development Kit makes it easy for you to start experimenting with quantum computing now and includes: · A native, quantum-focused programming language called Q# · Local and Azure-hosted simulators for you to test your Q# solution · And sample Q# code and libraries to help you get started

In this demo, she walks through a few code examples and explains where quantum principles like superposition and entanglement apply. She explains how quantum communication works using teleportation as your first “Hello World” inspired program. And keep watching to see more complex computations with molecular hydrogen.  

Recent advances in quantum computing means that we are that much closer to solving big problems like protein folding and traffic routing.

Speaking of the latter, Ford, along with Microsoft, recently unveiled some research along the line of improving traffic in Seattle with the use of “Quantum-inspired” computing — something that came up quite a bit at MLADS a few weeks ago.

“Our growing quantum computing team is working with Microsoft and others to investigate how this technology can be used in areas ranging from robotics to aerodynamics,” Ford Chief Technology Officer Ken Washington said in a blog post Tuesday. “While we’re still in the early stages of quantum computing development, encouraging progress has been made that can help us take what we’ve learned in the field and start to apply it to problems we want to solve today, while scaling to more complex problems tomorrow.”