Google has decided to fess up about their recent advancement in quantum supremacy.

We’re marking a major milestone in quantum computing research that opens up new possibilities for this technology. Learn how the Google AI Quantum team demonstrated how a quantum computer can perform a task no classical computer can in an experiment called “quantum supremacy.”

Seeker examines a leaked paper from Google claimed that a quantum computer demonstrated “quantum supremacy.”

But what does that mean exactly?

Quantum computers’ potential and the advantages they promise over classical computers all remain largely theoretical, and hypothetically speaking, it is predicted that quantum computers will be able to solve problems that are beyond the reach of the classical computers we use today. Passing such a threshold will be considered proof of what we call “quantum supremacy.”

Here’s an interesting talk from Microsoft Research on a quantum computing case study in conjucction with the University of Washington.

Case study: Quantum computing curriculum developed with the University of Washington Recently, our Quantum Software experts partnered with UW to bring a 10-week Introduction to Quantum Computing and Quantum Programming in Q# to the school of Computer Science. Learn how students can get started with hands-on quantum programming quickly by completing a rich collection of quantum programming exercises in Q# (‘coding katas’).

Microsoft’s Quantum development kit (QDK) and its programing language, Q#, are poised to empower both research and education in quantum computing and quantum programming.

The QDK is provided with kata-based tutorials help to teach basic concepts of quantum computing such as superposition or measurement, or quantum algorithms (e.g. Grover search algorithm), providing a valuable tool for developers looking to get started in quantum computing.