Krysta Svore, principal researcher at Microsoft, demonstrates the new Microsoft Quantum Development Kit.

The Quantum Development Kit makes it easy for you to start experimenting with quantum computing now and includes: · A native, quantum-focused programming language called Q# · Local and Azure-hosted simulators for you to test your Q# solution · And sample Q# code and libraries to help you get started

In this demo, she walks through a few code examples and explains where quantum principles like superposition and entanglement apply. She explains how quantum communication works using teleportation as your first “Hello World” inspired program. And keep watching to see more complex computations with molecular hydrogen.  

Recent advances in quantum computing means that we are that much closer to solving big problems like protein folding and traffic routing.

Speaking of the latter, Ford, along with Microsoft, recently unveiled some research along the line of improving traffic in Seattle with the use of “Quantum-inspired” computing — something that came up quite a bit at MLADS a few weeks ago.

“Our growing quantum computing team is working with Microsoft and others to investigate how this technology can be used in areas ranging from robotics to aerodynamics,” Ford Chief Technology Officer Ken Washington said in a blog post Tuesday. “While we’re still in the early stages of quantum computing development, encouraging progress has been made that can help us take what we’ve learned in the field and start to apply it to problems we want to solve today, while scaling to more complex problems tomorrow.”

Google has decided to fess up about their recent advancement in quantum supremacy.

We’re marking a major milestone in quantum computing research that opens up new possibilities for this technology. Learn how the Google AI Quantum team demonstrated how a quantum computer can perform a task no classical computer can in an experiment called “quantum supremacy.”

Seeker examines a leaked paper from Google claimed that a quantum computer demonstrated “quantum supremacy.”

But what does that mean exactly?

Quantum computers’ potential and the advantages they promise over classical computers all remain largely theoretical, and hypothetically speaking, it is predicted that quantum computers will be able to solve problems that are beyond the reach of the classical computers we use today. Passing such a threshold will be considered proof of what we call “quantum supremacy.”