Commercially viable quantum computing could be here sooner than you think, thanks to a new innovation that shrinks quantum tech down onto a chip: a cryochip.

Seeker explains:

It seems like quantum computers will likely be a big part of our computing future—but getting them to do anything super useful has been famously difficult. Lots of new technologies are aiming to get commercially viable quantum computing here just a little bit faster, including one innovation that shrinks quantum technology down onto a chip.

Because our most powerful classical computers are limited in the chemical modeling they can perform, so are the solutions they can unlock.

Quantum computing could change that.

On this episode of Quantum Impact, Dr. Krysta Svore, general manager of quantum systems and software at Microsoft, heads to Richland, Washington to meet with Dr. Nathan Baker and Dr. Bojana Ginovska at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Microsoft is partnering with PNNL to bring the power of quantum to our understanding of chemistry. One of PNNL’s areas of interest is catalysis, or the process of converting chemicals from one form to another, and Nathan shares the complexity involved in truly understanding that process.

Bojana, a computational chemist, then speaks with Krysta about her work studying nitrogenase, an enzyme present in healthy soil. She’s exploring how we can turn nitrogen into ammonia for agriculture in a way that doesn’t deplete our energy resources.

Together with PNNL, Microsoft is working to develop quantum algorithms to help solve challenging problems in chemistry, which will have hugely positive impacts on our world and our planet’s future.

Lex Fridman interviews Roger Penrose, a physicist, mathematician, and philosopher at University of Oxford.

He has made fundamental contributions in many disciplines from the mathematical physics of general relativity and cosmology to the limitations of a computational view of consciousness. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.

Time Index:

  • 0:00 – Introduction
  • 3:51 – 2001: A Space Odyssey
  • 9:43 – Consciousness and computation
  • 23:45 – What does it mean to “understand”
  • 31:37 – What’s missing in quantum mechanics?
  • 40:09 – Whatever consciousness is, it’s not a computation
  • 44:13 – Source of consciousness in the human brain
  • 1:02:57 – Infinite cycles of big bangs
  • 1:22:05 – Most beautiful idea in mathematics

Lex Fridman interviews Lee Smolin, a theoretical physicist, co-inventor of loop quantum gravity, and a contributor of many interesting ideas to cosmology, quantum field theory, the foundations of quantum mechanics, theoretical biology, and the philosophy of science.

He is the author of several books including one that critiques the state of physics and string theory called The Trouble with Physics, and his latest book, Einstein’s Unfinished Revolution: The Search for What Lies Beyond the Quantum.

This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast. 

Time Stamps:

  • 0:00 – Introduction
  • 3:03 – What is real?
  • 5:03 – Scientific method and scientific progress
  • 24:57 – Eric Weinstein and radical ideas in science
  • 29:32 – Quantum mechanics and general relativity
  • 47:24 – Sean Carroll and many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics
  • 55:33 – Principles in science
  • 57:24 – String theory

Quantum technology has the potential to revolutionize whole fields of computing; from cryptography to molecular modelling. But how do quantum computers work? Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe

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Why is it that we can see these multiple histories play out on the quantum scale, and why do lose sight of them on our macroscopic scale?

Many physicists believe that the answer lies in a process known as quantum decoherence.

Does conscious observation of a quantum system cause the wavefunction to collapse? The upshot is that more and more physicists think that consciousness – and even measurement – doesn’t directly cause wavefunction collapse.

In fact probably there IS no clear Heisenberg cut. The collapse itself may be an illusion, and the alternate histories that the wavefunction represents may continue forever. The question then becomes: why is it that we can see these multiple histories play out on the quantum scale, and why do lose sight of them on our macroscopic scale? Many physicists believe that the answer lies in a process known as quantum decoherence.