Imagine a Raspberry Pi cluster computing kit for $128. Well, imagine no more. Just think of what AI-infused IoT geeky things that could be built with this.

Raspberry Pi computers have been quite the revolution for makers, encouraging experimentation and creativity thanks to their low cost and compact size. And while the tiny computers are by no means high-end in their processing power, they continue to get faster with each generation. Now, you can gang together […]

The Raspberry Pi 4 could not have come at a better time and now is the moment for new developers to start experimenting with the technology. This powerful, yet tiny, computer can be used for a variety of functions, but our focus today will be on using the Pi 4 for image processing in a small package and low power setting.

The computing power of the Raspberry Pi 4 is higher compared to previous generations. This means that it can perform inference fairly quickly. It can be used for various types of applications. These include a rock-paper-scissors detection machine, home surveillance through motion detection, object detection for authorized entry (pet vs. animal) or even to give vision to a robot.

If you’ve never seen a hackspace up close and personal, then you’re missing out. There are quite a few around the world. Microsoft has several on its larger campuses. In Microsoft terms, they are referred to as the Garage.  There’s even on at the Rockville Science Center.

Hackspaces are locations where people can work on various hardware projects, have access to specialized equipment, and learn various aspects of hardware and software programming.

In this video from Computerphile, take a virtual tour of the hackspace in Nottingham, UK.

edureka! has compiled a list of the top 7 IoT projects. If you’re impatient, here’s the list of the projects showcased in the video.

  • Biometrics System
  • Smart Irrigation System
  • Security Camera & Door Unlock System
  • Smart Home
  • Smart City
  • Zelda Ocarina Controlled Home Automation
  • Jarvis

In the second episode of this series, Dmitry and Suz Hinton cover the development process for deploying and debugging your very first Windows IoT Core application, “Hello Blinky”. An explanation of the breadboard setup is followed by a demonstration of using Visual Studio on a PC to run the Hello Blinky UWP application remotely on the Raspberry Pi.

A brief walkthrough of the Hello Blinky source code reveals a familiar set of APIs and a couple of new ones unique to Windows IoT Core. A tour of the deployment and debugging process will help equip you with the confidence to replicate the same setup on your own.

You can find all the episodes in this series as they go live in this YouTube playlist.

Resources:

  1. Getting Started Developing Applications
  2. Debugging your application
  3. Hello Blinky Sample on GitHub