Machine Learning with Phil has got another interesting look at Deep Q Learning as part of a preview of his course.

The two biggest innovations in deep Q learning were the introduction of the target network and the replay memory. One would think that simply bolting a deep neural network to the Q learning algorithm would be enough for a robust deep Q learning agent, but that isn’t the case. In this video I’ll show you how this naive implementation of the deep q learning agent fails, and spectacularly at that.

This is an excerpt from my new course, Deep Q Learning From Paper to Code which you can get on sale with this link

https://www.udemy.com/course/deep-q-learning-from-paper-to-code/?couponCode=CYBERMONDAY19

Samuel Arzt shows off a project where an AI learns to park a car in a parking lot in a 3D physics simulation.

The simulation was implemented using Unity’s ML-Agents framework (https://unity3d.com/machine-learning).

From the video description:

The AI consists of a deep Neural Network with 3 hidden layers of 128 neurons each. It is trained with the Proximal Policy Optimization (PPO) algorithm, which is a Reinforcement Learning approach.

Dani, a game developer, recently made a game and decided to train an AI to play it.

A couple of weeks ago I made a video “Making a Game in ONE Day (12 Hours)”, and today I’m trying to teach an A.I to play my game!

Basically I’m gonna use Neural Networks to make the A.I learn to play my game.

This is something I’ve always wanted to do, and I’m really happy I finally got around to do it. Some of the biggest inspirations for this is obviously carykh, Jabrils & Codebullet!