Lex Fridman sits down with Colin Angle, the CEO and co-founder of iRobot.

iRobot is robotics company that for 29 years has been creating robots that operate successfully in the real world, not as a demo or on a scale of dozens, but on a scale of thousands and millions.

As of this year, iRobot has sold more than 25 million robots to consumers, including the Roomba vacuum cleaning robot, the Braava floor mopping robot, and soon the Terra lawn mowing robot. 25 million robots successfully operating autonomously in people’s homes to me is an incredible accomplishment of science, engineering, logistics, and all kinds of entrepreneurial innovation.

In this video, take a closer look at a commercial LIDAR sensor for hobbyists.

Find out how the sensor manages to measure the distance to objects placed all around it and how we can use this data with a computer and an Arduino.

At the end watch a small robot which uses the LIDAR system to “crudely” navigate through a room.

Industrial robots have been around for decades. What will happen when they are connected to AI? What will the job market look like and how will entire industries change?

If we were to ask where the combination of robotics and AI can provide industrial transformation, the immediate view in many people’s minds is the direct replacement of human workers, for example in picking strawberries. This is only a part of the picture, significant gains are also enabled by replacing or upgrading existing machines (see our welding example above), by augmenting human capabilities (such as by presetting no-go zones in robotic surgery) and by opening completely new options that previously were not possible (for example micro surgery robots may need to make their own decisions due to difficulty in communicating with them inside the body).

We typically imagine robots looking like humans, but there’s a real advantage to other “form factors” that mimic pack animals.

For example, check out this new robot that MIT just made: a mini cheetah robot, the first four-legged robot to do a backflip.

At only 20 pounds the limber quadruped can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right side up or upside down. More practically, the robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person’s walking speed.

The Robot Operating System – also called ROS – is a framework for building Robotics applications. ROS is supported by a large community, which have built thousands of nodes – individual robot behaviors which can be composed into complex solutions. This ecosystem has been enabled on Windows. Learn how to get started, some of the differences and some of the reasons you’d want to use Windows over other operating systems. Check out the get started guide: https://aka.ms/ros