Worried about a shark attack when you go to the beach? Then you need to watch this video.

From causation and correlation, to relative and absolute risk, Jennifer Rogers explains how to figure out if the stats we are presented in newspapers are accurate.

Jennifer Rogers holds the position of Director of Statistical Consultancy Services at the University of Oxford having previously worked as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Statistics funded by the National Institute of Health Research. She has a special interest in the development and application of novel statistical methodologies, particularly in medicine. Her main area of expertise is the analysis of recurrent events and her research has recently focused on developing and implementing appropriate methodology for the analysis of repeat hospitalisations in patients with heart failure but her research has many other applications in medicine such as epilepsy and cancer, but also in retail and engineering. She works alongside other statisticians, clinicians, computer scientists, industry experts and regulators.

In this talk given at the Royal Institute, Eugenia Cheng explores how anyone can think like a mathematician to understand what people are really telling us – and how we can argue back.

Taking a careful scalpel to fake news, politics, privilege, sexism and dozens of other real-world situations, she will teach us how to find clarity without losing nuance.

Time is something we all experience and wish we had more of. But what exactly is time?

From Boltzmann to quantum theory, from Einstein to loop quantum gravity, our understanding of time has been undergoing radical transformations. Carlo Rovelli brings together physics, philosophy and art to unravel the mystery of time.