Once upon a time (around 14 years ago), I was a Tablet PC developer, MVP, and all around fan boy.

In other words, I was into tablets before they were cool. Indeed, I was in to tablets before they were practical.

And this review by RetroManCave of a Azus R2H UMPC (Ultra Mobile PC) indicates many of the shortcomings of this area in mobile computing.

The dark ages of mobile technology were tough. We knew we wanted portability and convenience but the monolithic tech firms of the time were slow to deliver and left the door open for much needed competition from Apple, Samsung and Google to give us what we wanted. The Asus R2H is a relic from that period before the dawn. It is, the tablet Homer Simpson might have built.

2020 is the year 5G will finally arrive for some, but will it live up to the hype?

Part of the problem is that 5G isn’t one thing, it’s a collection of different technologies, and various cell providers are focusing on different improvements that can radically change the experience of 5G.

Engadget explains. 

Engadget has a first look at Samsung’s robot chef.

Normally when I miss breakfast, it’s by choice. Today, it was because I was in a rush to get to Samsung’s booth on the CES show floor and see if I could get any face time with the company’s cute new rolling robot. (That, uh, didn’t go so great.) The trip was still well worth it, though, because I got to eat a tofu salad partially made by a pair of robotic arms slung from the bottom of some kitchen cabinets.

Read the full story on Engadget.  

While the quantum computing age may be “just around the corner,” traditional computing is not going anywhere anytime soon.

In fact, innovation there is increasing to keep up the promise of Moore’s Law.

Engadget takes a look at the process behind making microchips faster.

Microchips are one of the most complicated objects humanity has created, packing billions of transistors into a chip only a few centimeters across. These transistors keep getting smaller and more efficient, and the current process to make chips is already astounding, requiring dozens of steps, fantastically complicated machines, and atomic-scale precision. But the current state of the art has reached its physical limits. The structures on a chip are now smaller than the wavelength of light used to make them, and any more progress will require a big change.

That change is EUV, a radically new way of making chips that uses super high energy UV light created from a complex process involving plasma and lasers. EUV will enable our devices to keep getting smaller, faster, and more efficient, but where the current process to make chips already feels like sci-fi technology, EUV feels like magic.