Scientists might have reached the theoretical limit of how strong this particular material can get, designing the first-ever super-light carbon nanostructure that’s stronger than diamond.

The latest development in the nanoworld of carbon comes from a team that has designed something called carbon plate-nanolattices. Under a scanning electron microscope, they look like little cubes, and the math indicated that this structure would be incredibly strong, but it’s been too difficult to actually make, until now.

The team’s success was made possible by a 3D printing process called two-photon polymerization direct laser writing, which is essentially 3D printing on the level of atoms and photons.

Find out more about this technique and what the result could mean for the future of medicine, electronics aerospace and more in this Elements.

This Seeker video explains.

Sabine Hossenfelder explains the most important and omnipresent ingredients of quantum mechanics: what is the wave-function and how do you calculate with it.

Much of what makes quantum mechanics difficult is really not the mathematics. In fact, quantum mechanics is one of the easier theories of physics. The mathematics is mostly just linear algebra: vectors, matrices, linear transformations, and so on. You’ve learned most of it in school already! However, the math of quantum mechanics looks funny because physicists use a weird notation, called the bra-ket notation. I tell you how this works, what it’s good for, and how to calculate with it.

Here is an interesting development in the field of biotech: digital bioprocess replicas.

While it sounds like it may be straight out of Blade Runner, the technology is very real and may soon revolutionize pharmaceuticals.

A “digital bioprocess replica” is, as the name suggests, a computer model of a bioprocess. The aim is to simulate the entire process, including all critical parameters and quality attributes, to enable optimization.

Data-rich bioprocess replicas can accelerate development, according to Jens Smiatek, PhD, from the Institute for Computational Physics at the Universität Stuttgart in Germany.

“Pharmaceutical manufacturing and process development can be improved by the early analysis of relevant critical process parameters (CPPs) and critical quality attributes (CQAs), the efficient determination of proven acceptable ranges (PARs) and less time-consuming exploratory experiments,” he says.

Silicon may be at the heart of most gadgets, but it’s not the only semiconductor around.

Gallium nitride has been getting a lot of attention recently for it’s electrical properties, which outperform silicon in a lot of areas.

Gallium nitride has the potential to revolution power systems, including solar, electric vehicles, and even phone chargers.

Beyond that, it’s finding uses in the mobile industry, and could even be used to build ultra fast processors.

But how feasible is any of that, and even if it’s possible, how long will it take?