Engadget has a first look at Samsung’s robot chef.

Normally when I miss breakfast, it’s by choice. Today, it was because I was in a rush to get to Samsung’s booth on the CES show floor and see if I could get any face time with the company’s cute new rolling robot. (That, uh, didn’t go so great.) The trip was still well worth it, though, because I got to eat a tofu salad partially made by a pair of robotic arms slung from the bottom of some kitchen cabinets.

Read the full story on Engadget.  

Katherine Bindley of the Wall Street Journal is at CES to take a look at the latest AI-infused cameras on the market.

Two new smart systems use cameras, artificial intelligence and an assortment of sensors to keep watch over you—Patscan looks for threats in public spaces, while Eyeris monitors the driver and passengers in a car. WSJ’s Katherine Bindley visits CES to explores their advantages, as well as their privacy costs.

While the quantum computing age may be “just around the corner,” traditional computing is not going anywhere anytime soon.

In fact, innovation there is increasing to keep up the promise of Moore’s Law.

Engadget takes a look at the process behind making microchips faster.

Microchips are one of the most complicated objects humanity has created, packing billions of transistors into a chip only a few centimeters across. These transistors keep getting smaller and more efficient, and the current process to make chips is already astounding, requiring dozens of steps, fantastically complicated machines, and atomic-scale precision. But the current state of the art has reached its physical limits. The structures on a chip are now smaller than the wavelength of light used to make them, and any more progress will require a big change.

That change is EUV, a radically new way of making chips that uses super high energy UV light created from a complex process involving plasma and lasers. EUV will enable our devices to keep getting smaller, faster, and more efficient, but where the current process to make chips already feels like sci-fi technology, EUV feels like magic.

Quantum physics is no longer just for academic researchers or engineers working on quantum computers.

It is quickly becoming a national security imperative.

How quickly quantum advances will influence military power will depend on the work of researchers like Jonathan Baugh. A professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada, Baugh is working on a device that’s part of a bigger project to develop quantum radar. Its intended users: stations in the Arctic run by the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, a joint US-Canadian organization.

In the middle of the New Mexico desert lies Spaceport America, a glittering, alien structure advertised as the very first purpose-built commercial spaceport.

It’s home to Virgin Galactic, a space startup that promises to send tourists into orbit as early as next year.

But even if that milestone happens, it will follow years of delays, setbacks, and even tragedy. Local residents in the nearby town of Truth or Consequences were told to expect big things when New Mexico joined the private space economy, but many now wonder if the dream of a space industry will ever materialize. 

Verge Science explores.