Microgravity can be used to unlock old materials and make new ones in ways that can’t be replicated on Earth. Private companies know this, and are leading the charge toward the next gold rush. But can they turn low Earth orbit into a home for the next industrial revolution?

Bloomberg takes a look at the future of non-terrestrial real estate.

Over the past few decades, the International Space Station has allowed astronauts to live, work and conduct research in microgravity. But with the station’s planned retirement by 2030, private companies are being asked to create the next generation of space habitat.

Bloomberg describes how the first trillionaires will come to be.

There are millions of asteroids in our solar system. Because some are full of materials that are rare on Earth, they have been valued at stupendous amounts. But the most valuable resource in space may be something that’s abundant back on the ground.

Jamie Paik explores more creative forms of robots.

From the video description:

Taking design cues from origami, robotician Jamie Paik and her team created “robogamis”: folding robots made out super-thin materials that can reshape and transform themselves. In this talk and tech demo, Paik shows how robogamis could adapt to achieve a variety of tasks on earth (or in space) and demonstrates how they roll, jump, catapult like a slingshot and even pulse like a beating heart.

Here’s a great idea for powering the next generation of innovators on this planet and a few others.

Microsoft’s education arm and NASA have come together to create online lessons to get school students interested about space. The eight online lesson plans range from titles such as Designing Astro Socks to protect astronauts’ feet in microgravity to designing one’s own space station, CNET reported on Friday. The […]

SpaceX and Blue Origin think point-to-point space travel will replace flights as the preferred means of passenger travel. A plane ride from New York City to Shanghai is about 15 hours – and it could be as long as 29 hours with connecting flights.

With point-to-point travel, SpaceX says it could get you there in less than an hour. How realistic is this approach to long-haul travel?