In the AI-centric world I (and many data scientists) tend to live in, everything is cutting edge (or close to it). We take cloud and PaaS for granted. It’s hard for us to imagine that in 2019, many organizations are still running SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 in production. Further more, many of these same organizations are still using SSIS 2008 and 2008 R2 in production as well.

Yesterday, support ended for SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2. Leaving many in a state of fear and loathing. Andy Leonard, co-host of Data Driven, has written an insight post about this very problem.

Cheer up, you’re not alone and it can only get better from here on out.

If you are reading this post and thinking or saying, “Yep. He’s writing about me,” you are not alone. If you feel bad about this, I have spoken to people who are still running DTS (Data Transformation Services) from the SQL Server 2000 days. If you’re feeling smug because you’re running SQL Server 2016 or 2017 in production, test-drive the moccasins of folks who are hampered by mission-critical third-party enterprise solutions for which later SQL Server versions have not been certified – some of whom are operating in regulation-heavy industries.