Because our most powerful classical computers are limited in the chemical modeling they can perform, so are the solutions they can unlock.

Quantum computing could change that.

On this episode of Quantum Impact, Dr. Krysta Svore, general manager of quantum systems and software at Microsoft, heads to Richland, Washington to meet with Dr. Nathan Baker and Dr. Bojana Ginovska at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Microsoft is partnering with PNNL to bring the power of quantum to our understanding of chemistry. One of PNNL’s areas of interest is catalysis, or the process of converting chemicals from one form to another, and Nathan shares the complexity involved in truly understanding that process.

Bojana, a computational chemist, then speaks with Krysta about her work studying nitrogenase, an enzyme present in healthy soil. She’s exploring how we can turn nitrogen into ammonia for agriculture in a way that doesn’t deplete our energy resources.

Together with PNNL, Microsoft is working to develop quantum algorithms to help solve challenging problems in chemistry, which will have hugely positive impacts on our world and our planet’s future.

While quantum computing may seem like the next frontier, its foundations have actually been around for billions of years—in the natural world.

This episode of Quantum Impact explores the ways in which we can tap into nature’s organic systems and processes to help solve some of today’s most pressing issues around climate change and environmental sustainability.  

Check out how Stora Enso makes RFID tags green

Enabling automated item level processes and bringing business and environmental benefits to the industries the RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) based solutions are getting their lost interest back step by step.

In retail for example apparel industry and retailers are implementing RFID and driving related development. Material and manufacturing point of view Stora Enso has introduced most sustainable tags to the market – providing scalability and performance.

Each day around a third of all food harvested or produced around the globe is wasted. This means that about 1.3 billion tons of food feeds no one.  IKEA’s restaurants serve 680 million people each year and the company takes food waste seriously.  IKEA has enlisted AI in its sustainability efforts.

IKEA is a proponent of the “circular economy”, which is an economic system based on minimizing waste and making the most of resources. It is basically the opposite of taking materials, manufacturing products (or food), and then disposing of the end product. Instead it is a regenerative approach that reduces waste.