The danger of artificial intelligence isn’t that it’s going to rebel against us, but that it’s going to do exactly what we ask it to do, says AI researcher Janelle Shane.

From the video description:

Sharing the weird, sometimes alarming antics of AI algorithms as they try to solve human problems — like creating new ice cream flavors or recognizing cars on the road — Shane shows why AI doesn’t yet measure up to real brains.

Face-recognition technology is quickly becoming more common. Should we be concerned?

It’s being used to unlock phones, clear customs, identify immigrants and solve crimes. In the Video Op-Ed above, Clare Garvie demands the United States government hit pause on face recognition. She argues that while this convenient technology may seem benign to those who feel they have nothing to hide, face recognition is something we should all fear. Police databases now feature the faces of nearly half of Americans — most of whom have no idea their image is there. The invasive technology violates citizens’ constitutional rights and is subject to an alarming level of manipulation and bias.

Wall Street Journal explores the future of satellite internet.

The most reliable streaming providers have typically used cable to deliver content. But that’s all changing with the launch of new and better satellites that could one day give us 5G, low latency data. The Wall Street Journal speaks with the chief of the International Bureau at the FCC to discover how those changes are happening almost overnight.

Our brain has 86 million neurons connected by 3 million kilometers of nerve fibers and The Human Brain Project is mapping it all.

One of the key applications is neuromorphic computing – computers inspired by brain architecture that may one day be able to learn as we do.