In case you’re wondering why you would want to “de-Google” your phone, then watch this Al Jazeera documentary.

In mid-2020, a mobile phone belonging to an Al Jazeera Arabic investigative team was hacked. Over the next few months, reporter Tamer Almisshal and the Canadian research group Citizen Lab investigated Pegasus, the sophisticated spyware used.

Pegasus is manufactured by an Israeli technology company called the NSO Group and is among the most advanced spyware in the world. It can access and infiltrate a smartphone without the owner clicking a link, opening an email or even answering their phone – meaning it can go undetected.

This investigation exposes how Pegasus works, how governments like Saudi Arabia and the UAE have bought the hugely expensive spyware and how it has been used beyond the stated intentions of the NSO Group of “developing technology to prevent and investigate terror and crime” – including to target journalists.

Earlier today, I shared Lex Fridman’s discussion on DeepMind’s recent advancement on protein folding.

Join DeepMind  Science Engineer Kathryn Tunyasuvunakool to explore the hidden world of proteins and why this discovery is a big deal.

These tiny molecular machines underpin every biological process in every living thing and each one has a unique 3D shape that determines how it works and what it does.

But figuring out the exact structure of a protein is an expensive and often time-consuming process, meaning we only know the exact 3D structure of a tiny fraction of the 200m proteins known to science.

Being able to accurately predict the shape of proteins could accelerate research in every field of biology.

That could lead to important breakthroughs like finding new medicines or finding proteins and enzymes that break down industrial and plastic waste or efficiently capture carbon from the atmosphere.