Engadget has a first look at Samsung’s robot chef.

Normally when I miss breakfast, it’s by choice. Today, it was because I was in a rush to get to Samsung’s booth on the CES show floor and see if I could get any face time with the company’s cute new rolling robot. (That, uh, didn’t go so great.) The trip was still well worth it, though, because I got to eat a tofu salad partially made by a pair of robotic arms slung from the bottom of some kitchen cabinets.

Read the full story on Engadget.  

Katherine Bindley of the Wall Street Journal is at CES to take a look at the latest AI-infused cameras on the market.

Two new smart systems use cameras, artificial intelligence and an assortment of sensors to keep watch over you—Patscan looks for threats in public spaces, while Eyeris monitors the driver and passengers in a car. WSJ’s Katherine Bindley visits CES to explores their advantages, as well as their privacy costs.

While the quantum computing age may be “just around the corner,” traditional computing is not going anywhere anytime soon.

In fact, innovation there is increasing to keep up the promise of Moore’s Law.

Engadget takes a look at the process behind making microchips faster.

Microchips are one of the most complicated objects humanity has created, packing billions of transistors into a chip only a few centimeters across. These transistors keep getting smaller and more efficient, and the current process to make chips is already astounding, requiring dozens of steps, fantastically complicated machines, and atomic-scale precision. But the current state of the art has reached its physical limits. The structures on a chip are now smaller than the wavelength of light used to make them, and any more progress will require a big change.

That change is EUV, a radically new way of making chips that uses super high energy UV light created from a complex process involving plasma and lasers. EUV will enable our devices to keep getting smaller, faster, and more efficient, but where the current process to make chips already feels like sci-fi technology, EUV feels like magic.

Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads to Finland for a three-part exploration of this traditionally contented country’s tech industry.

Episode One tackles the critical role Nokia once played in its economy, and the devastating impact Apple’s iPhone had on both.

Since then, Finland has managed to revive the sector: Instead of the once-ubiquitous Nokia phone, Helsinki’s vibrant tech scene is now dominated by companies making mobile games like Angry Birds and Clash of Clans.

The danger of artificial intelligence isn’t that it’s going to rebel against us, but that it’s going to do exactly what we ask it to do, says AI researcher Janelle Shane.

From the video description:

Sharing the weird, sometimes alarming antics of AI algorithms as they try to solve human problems — like creating new ice cream flavors or recognizing cars on the road — Shane shows why AI doesn’t yet measure up to real brains.

Face-recognition technology is quickly becoming more common. Should we be concerned?

It’s being used to unlock phones, clear customs, identify immigrants and solve crimes. In the Video Op-Ed above, Clare Garvie demands the United States government hit pause on face recognition. She argues that while this convenient technology may seem benign to those who feel they have nothing to hide, face recognition is something we should all fear. Police databases now feature the faces of nearly half of Americans — most of whom have no idea their image is there. The invasive technology violates citizens’ constitutional rights and is subject to an alarming level of manipulation and bias.