Sven Groot explains how the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) can access and modify Linux files from Windows applications, going into deep dive level details on the underlying architecture and how it uses Plan 9’s 9P protocol to act as a file server between Linux and Windows. Sven Groot is a developer on the Windows Subsystem for Linux, and he is joined by Craig Loewen: a program manager on the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Craig Loewen’s Blog Post here.

The Robot Operating System – also called ROS – is a framework for building Robotics applications. ROS is supported by a large community, which have built thousands of nodes – individual robot behaviors which can be composed into complex solutions. This ecosystem has been enabled on Windows. Learn how to get started, some of the differences and some of the reasons you’d want to use Windows over other operating systems. Check out the get started guide: https://aka.ms/ros

Customers across industries, whether in an industrial setting or retail environment, are looking for ways to remotely provision and manage their IoT devices. Direct device access may not always be feasible when IoT devices are out in the field or on the factory floor. Microsoft Azure IoT Device Agent enables operators to configure, monitor and manage their devices remotely from their Azure dashboard. In this episode of the #IoTShow you will get an overview of Microsoft Azure IoT Device Agent with a demo.

Get the code: https://github.com/ms-iot/azure-client-tools

Learn more: https://aka.ms/azureiotdeviceagentv2blog

Create a Free Account (Azure): https://aka.ms/aft-iot

Find out what Microsoft Windows IoT has planned for 2019! Get an early look into how Windows IoT can help you quickly build safe, smart devices that can be the foundation of your IoT solutions.

Join the Microsoft team at an #IoTInActionMS event: http://bit.ly/2O5gPHn

In the first episode of this series, Dmitry and his guest Suz Hinton introduce Windows IoT Core as a way of building applications for IoT solutions. We cover some foundational topics such as how Windows IoT works, and what it is designed for. We’ll also discuss how Windows IoT applications are developed, and how they differ from regular Universal Windows Platform applications.

Featuring a brief introduction to breadboards and the Raspberry Pi, we set the scene for writing your first Windows IoT Core UWP application, detailed in the second episode of this series.

You can find all the episodes in this series as they go live in our YouTube playlist.

Resources:

  1. Windows IoT Core Overview
  2. How breadboards work
  3. How to install Windows IoT Core on your Raspberry Pi

The Windows Community Toolkit is a collection of helper functions, custom controls, and app services.

In this video, Senior Program Manager Nikola Metulev (@metulev) comes on the show to give us a walk through some of the useful tools inside of the toolkit

  • [01:19] – Getting started with the Windows Community Toolkit
  • [02:10] – Exploring the controls
  • [04:25] – A look at the WebView control
  • [06:28] – New controls for UWP
  • [07:14] – The Animation APIs
  • [13:27] – Microsoft Graph controls
  • [15:18] – Services provided in the toolkit
  • [19:58] – Getting started resources

 

 

With Windows 10 IoT Core, you can build devices to make a better world not just for people, but also our furry friends .

Here’s a project on how to build a Pet Recognition Door by connecting a webcam, infrared motion sensor, servo motors, and OpenCV facial recognition on a Minnowboard Max running Windows IoT Core.

This Pet Recognition Door will let your pet come and go, while keeping unwelcome critters from paying you an unexpected visit.  Are you feline ready to start creating?